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Sometimes I worry my BP is too low
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Sometimes I worry my BP is too low

Normally it runs anywhere from 100-120 over 70-80 but some days (like today) it runs even lower in the 90's/60's and a couple times today it's been in the 80's/50's. I don't feel dizzy or like I'm going to faint but I do feel very lethargic and tired. I spoke with my Dr. a couple months back about it and he said as long as I'm not bleeding to death or fainting it's nothing to worry about.
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Avatar_m_tn
If your Dr isn't concerned, I wouldn't be. Lethargy and fatigue would be associated with something else entirely. Lack of sleep, anxiety, diet, lack of exercise: those could all be causes (not implying all of them are true in your case, just an FYI).

As you said, if your low BP were an issue, you'd feel faint or dizzy, as your blood wouldn't be getting to where it needs to be as easily as possible. 80/50 is low, but your 90s/60s is considered desirable.

Bottom line, I wouldn't think about it. Thinking about it only makes things worse (e.g. turning into fatigue). I've been diagnosed depressed, anxious and prone to panic. The best thing I've been able to do for myself is to try to stop thinking about things and focus on other stuff. Like work, school, writing.
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1305767_tn?1361196276
Yeah I have depression, anxiety and panic as well so I tend to pay too much attention to what my body is doing and get overly concerned. Thanks for your input.
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Avatar_m_tn
The best advice I've received was from my old GP:

When you look for symptoms, you will find them.

I'm a hypochondriac, and he knew how to work with me. It takes some effort, but if you can stop looking for symptoms and stop looking for what's wrong, it will make a world of difference for you.

I pay way too much attention to small changes and end up getting all worked up over nothing. I've been convinced I'm about to die no less than ten times in my life, and I'm still here.

I don't know about you, but here's my issue: the media loves to talk up the SILENT KILLERS!!! (exclamation points added for dramatic effect) The problem is, for every one person this information saves, twenty people like myself become obsessed in fear over the possibility of being sick.

The fact of the matter is, when something is dreadfully wrong, your body will let you know in a very loud way most of the time.

In your situation, I wouldn't worry. Hell, I'm a little envious. My BP is prehypertensive (not enough exercise, too much weight, too much salt, stressed), so I'd love to be lower.

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1305767_tn?1361196276
Thanks mbsc. Like you I'm a hypochondriac and pay way to much attention to the little changes in my body. You'd think with having so much health anxiety I'd take better care of myself but no, I smoke, don't eat right and don't exercise. I hardly eat anything because my stomach is usually so upset from anxiety and stress and I'm getting pretty thin.
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Avatar_m_tn
I've found that, after I force myself into a healthy routine, I feel much better. I had a pretty sever anxiety episode in January. The worse I've had since 2004. The problem is, most of my anxiety is tied to GERD. So, I had a wicked GERD attack, causing massive anxiety, and I lost 30 pounds in a month. I couldn't eat, and I started working out a lot. I got back to the point where I was running 30 minutes a day and doing weightlifting a couple times a week.

Today was the first time in five years that I was able to go out and have some drinks with friends AND eat, without having a major episode. It's been pretty awesome. I still feel some of the GERD effects, but I haven't had any of the anxiety because I've been able to turn away from it. Also, my exercising has caused many of the major triggers to go away (particularly heart rates).

The point being, if you can just start small and work your way into something, you'll see an improvement. I suggest to everyone, start by walking 30 minutes a day. Do it until it becomes a habit. After that, begin slowly adding things in.

Anxiety can be beaten. It takes some work. It takes some effort. It's not easy, but I've done it twice. And it feels great.
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1305767_tn?1361196276
Thank you. I've had anxiety for a long time going back to childhood. The severity of it comes and goes but I'd love to banish it for good.
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