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Three 2CM "Masses" found in liver. Help Please.
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Three 2CM "Masses" found in liver. Help Please.

Hello everyone,

I'm a 28 year old male, 195 lbs and in good physical shape. I do have a prior history of Melanoma 15 months ago on my right mid-back. It was caught in an extremely early stage and was removed by surgery. I recently started having abdomen pains so my Primary Care Doctor did full blood work which showed my Liver Enzymes were slightly elevated (65). This did not concern me much because I do drink alcohol and drank a good amount a few days prior to the blood tests. I also have no other symptoms. I eat regularly, no tiredness or anything out of the ordinary.

My Doctor sent me to get a Ultra Sound of the liver, gal bladder, pancreas and all the goodies in the RU area. The results came back and showed a 2CM "mass" inside my liver. I don't recall the exact area. My Doctor recommended a CAT scan to find out a little more about this mass. The CAT scan came back with concerning news for me. It showed three (3) masses in my liver, all around 2CM or slightly lower.

The radiologist suggests possible hemangioma(sp?) but recommends an MRI be done. So as you can expect I am EXTREMELY concerned now. I'm a father of a beautiful 3 year old daughter and want to be strong but when you talk about "masses" in your liver it is hard to be positive. Does anyone have any insight on what I'm going through? I'm 3 days away from the MRI and it is stressing me out to the point of a panic attack. Any helpful information is appreciated. Thanks in advance!    
8 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar_m_tn
I forgot to mention that I did take testosterone injections for about a year prior to this finding. I don't know if that would be related or not.  
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446474_tn?1404424777
The radiologist suggests possible hemangioma(sp?) but recommends an MRI be done. So as you can expect I am EXTREMELY concerned now. I'm a father of a beautiful 3 year old daughter and want to be strong but when you talk about "masses" in your liver it is hard to be positive. Does anyone have any insight on what I'm going through? I'm 3 days away from the MRI and it is stressing me out to the point of a panic attack. Any helpful information is appreciated. Thanks in advance!    


Try not to worry. Most liver masses are benign. The MRI will determine what the masses are and then you will know if there is anything to worry about.

I understand what you are going through as I have liver cancer and have had tumors in both lobes of my liver. But I have hep C and cirrhosis which is known to cause liver cancer. It is very rare to have liver cancer and not have  cirrhosis. You seem too young for cirrhosis. Try as best you can to calm done and distract yourself until you have the MRI. I only have a few months to liver because of my liver cancer but I should get a transplant in the next 2-3 weeks.

Good luck with your MRI!
Let us know what happens.
hector
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Avatar_m_tn
I'm so sorry to hear that Hector, I will pray for you in the coming day's. I will keep you posted. I'm just concerned because I was told the CAT scan could identify the masses. Now I have more testing to get done . . .

Thanks
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446474_tn?1404424777
CT scan can but MRI is more selective in differentiating between types of masses. It is best to get a accurate diagnosis so you don't have to worry.
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Non-Cancerous Liver Lesions
Diagnosis and Treatment

Overview of Non-Cancerous Liver Lesions

Masses within the liver are increasingly being detected inadvertently when patients are evaluated for unrelated reasons. These liver masses are usually benign (non-cancerous) in patients without underlying liver disease and usually need no specific treatment. We recommend that the work-up and management of benign lesions be overseen by a multidisciplinary team including radiologists, hepatologists, oncologists and surgeons to ensure a patient receives the best possible care.

Benign masses can be categorized into two groups: solid or cystic (fluid filled).

Solid Masses

Among the most common solid masses include:

Hemangioma

Focal nodular hyperplasia

Adenoma

Focal fatty change

Nodular regenerative hyperplasia

Hemangiomas are the most common of all benign liver masses. They are more prevalent in women and may be affected by hormonal changes. Symptoms such as pain are mostly noted in lesions less than 6 cm and are related to compression of adjacent structures. Bleeding is rare. Diagnosis of these lesions is usually made radiologically with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offering the most definitive means of diagnosis. No specific treatment is required for asymptomatic lesions whatever the size. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for symptomatic lesions.

Focal Nodular Hyperplasia (FNH) is the second most common benign lesion of the liver. It is usually asymptomatic and has no malignant potential or risk of rupture. Symptomatic lesions are usually larger and cause compression of adjacent structures. Laboratory studies are usually normal and diagnosis is made radiologically. At times a biopsy may be needed. Surgical resection is indicated only if the diagnosis is of question or the patient is symptomatic.

Adenomas are a rare entity and have a strong association with oral contraceptive use. Larger adenomas (less than 5 cm) may present with abdominal discomfort or a feeling of fullness. Other symptoms include nausea, vomiting and fevers. Larger lesions have a tendency to bleed (40%) and have a potential to become cancerous (10%). Diagnosis of these lesions is made by a combination of radiographic examinations and sometimes biopsy. Treatment should consist of first discontinuing oral contraception use and then radiographic follow up. Additionally, all lesions less than 4 - 5 cm or where malignancy cannot be excluded should be surgically resected.

Focal Fatty Change occurs when fat distribution within the liver is not evenly spread. Areas of increased fat accumulation are referred to as focal fatty change. Patients who have a history of diabetes, obesity, hepatitis C or malnutrition may be predisposed to this condition. Individuals are usually asymptomatic. These lesions are diagnosed by radiographic examination (MRI) and at times require a biopsy. No specific treatment is required.

Take care.
hector
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Avatar_m_tn
Thank you Hector,

I really do appreciate the comforting words. I will try and keep a positive attitude until I know further. I have the MRI Friday but don't know how long it will take to get the results with the Christmas holidays coming up. I will report my results when I receive them.
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446474_tn?1404424777
It could take a few days because of the holidays some staff go on vacation and things slow down a bit.
Focus on enjoying the holidays. Don't let waiting for results ruin the holiday season for you.

Think of all the good things in your life and enjoy yourself. This is what life is all about. Life is no dress rehearsal. Live it and love it. Appreciating your good health and all the good things in your life is always a good thing at this time of year. Assess the last year and set goals for the future.

Best to you and your family!
hector
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Avatar_m_tn
I received my MRI results today which diagnosed my lesions as Hemangiomas. Thank you Hector for the positive posts and feedback. You truly were a huge help to me when I needed one most.
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Avatar_m_tn
Just a follow up to those interested or curious. I had to meet with a GI today to go over the MRI results. The radiologist diagnosed the lesions as three Hemangiomas. What surprised me is the MRI results showed the lesions much smaller than the Ultrasound/CAT Scan. They were originally thought to be over 2CM (two of them) and one just over 1CM.

The MRI results showed two of them at 14MM (1.4CM?) and the other at 7MM. For peace of mind I have to have another MRI in 6 months to see if there is any growth. It was interesting seeing how much more accurate the MRI is versus the US and CT.  
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