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neck

Can you please explain the folloing to me?

FINDINGS:  The sagittal sequence demonstrates reversal of the normal cervical lordosis with kyphotic curvature centered at C4-5.  There is multilevel disc space narrowing with is most sever at C4-5, C5-6, and C6-7.  Mild end plate T1 and T2 hyperintensity are present at C5-6 in keeping with degenerative disc disease.

C4-5:  There is broad posterior disc/osteophyte complex with yields moderate central canal narrowing.  Central canal at this level measures approximately 9 mm.  There is uncovertebral and left facet joint hypertrophy at this level which yields severe left neural foraminal narrowing.

C5-C6:  Mild disc/osteophyte complex yields mild but not significant central canal narrowing.  The central canal at this level measures approximately 1.0 cm.  There is uncovertebral joint hypertrophy which yeilds moderate left neural foraminal narrowing.

The midline posterior fossa structures appear normal
Prevertebral soft tissues appears within low normal limits.

IMMPRESSION:

Reversal of the normal cervical lordosis with kyphotic curvature in the mid cervical spine.

Multileve degenerative disc disease is most severe at C4-5 where there is moderate central canal narrowing.  Left neural foraminal narrowing is most significant at C4-5, and C5-6 due to uncovertebral joint facet hypertrophy.
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Avatar_n_tn
Reversal of the cervical lordosis is just a description of the posture of your spine in the neck area - it is very non-specific and just means there is some underlying pain etc - it should get better with treatment and physcial therapy. Kyphosis is another descriptive term for some side to side deformity of the spine, is very common as we get older and can signify some underlying degenerative spinal problems.
There are many changes with wear and tear as we get older, this refers to the hyperintensities, narrowings and facet joint hypertrophy seen. Narrowings and hypertrophy can narrow the openings for nerves and pinch the nerves. Narrowing of the central canal can cause less space for the spinal cord, and eventaully cause pain adn trouble walking if severe.
8 Comments
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Avatar_m_tn
sounds like the MRI report of a middle aged person. just because you have positive findings on your MRI does not mean whatever symptoms you may have are due to these findings. your report sounds like that of many 40+ year olds--- i wouldn't be shocked over it. in a nutshell it reads like you have degenerative disc disease
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi,

I agree with above i.e., this reading signifying mainly degenerative disease.  

However, what was the reason you had this MRI taken?  Neck pain, arm weakness, anything below the waist?   If yes, your MRI may be suggestive of a cause for these symptoms (depending what they are).   Otherwise, it's just a normal variant from someone who is developing some degenerative disease.

Good luck.
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Avatar_n_tn
The patient in question is a 19 year old female that was rear ended in an accident.
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Avatar_n_tn
I was unfortunate enough to get whiplash twice when I was young.  I had the reversal with the curvature, too, but now am basically straight, maybe even with a bit of proper curve, and I believe this is because I see a chiro.

I am now middle age and have a lot of c-spine degenerative changes, but am told it was from the whiplash, the rheum asked me right away after seeing my MRI about whiplash.  I, also, now have nerve damage and have to see a neuro regularly as advised by my neurosurg.  (he thinks I will eventually need surgery and doesn't want me wait'g until I have perm. damage or atrophy).

I was told by an ortho who teams with my neurosurg not to see a chiro, but if I didn't I would be in so much pain and wouldn't be able to move my neck much at all.  I don't think I could walk, either, but that's another problem.  He is a straight chiro and says his adjustments aren't the same or as forceful as a reg. chiro.

If the 19 yr. old is having arm. upper back, or any other pain possibly from this injury they should get an EMG/NCS.
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Avatar_f_tn
Did doctor recommend conserative tretments or surgery? Sounds like big injury,how fast(mph) were both drivers going?
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Avatar_n_tn
Would you say that the osteophyte formation, considering that it is in a 19 year old individual, is a traumatic injury?

While it sounds degenerative in nature, it does not sound like the type of injury that someone of that age would have.

Also, could anyone refer me to a good medical source to get answers to questions such as these (ie. when an injury appears to be traumatic as opposed to degenerative)

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Avatar_n_tn
Help rookie here--first time to post.  It says post a comment. Am I allowed to ask questions about my injuries, or am I just supposed to comment on what is already posted?  Please help shy  rookie from Texas!

Marcbo
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