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How long to get over fractured shoulder
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How long to get over fractured shoulder

I sustained a hairline fracture of my right shoulder on 8-14.  Ortho said to let it heal on its own. Developed tremendous bruise so had MRI 2 weeks later. Showed nothing but fracture.  After two months, he prescribed p.t. 3x a week. PT has been going fairly well, but it is excruciatingly painful and I now seem to have reached an impasse.  It feels as if shoulder is frozen and will not go any further.  Two weeks ago, I had a cortisone shot in shoulder and went on Celebrex for a week.  No change at all.  In fact, I began to have stabbing pains in my arm.  He is going to request another MRI. This is a worker's comp claim. Am I just a whiner, or could something be wrong that was missed on the first MRI.  I have terrible muscle pain and cramping.  Is this just part of the course of recuperation from a broken shoulder?  I want answers, but I certainly don't want needless testing and expenses.  I understand that a shoulder injury is a touch road to travel, but how long does it usually take?
Tags: shoulder
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Hi,
     How are you? Firstly I would like to know about your injury, was it a clavicle fracture or injury to the rotator cuff. Clavicle fractures or collar bone fractures should heal completely within 12 weeks, but the pain usually subsides within a few weeks. Often patients are back to full activities before 12 weeks has passed, especially with younger patients.
Coming to rotator cuff injuries, they can lead to a condition called as frozen shoulder. A frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis is a shoulder joint with significant loss of its range of motion in all directions. Frozen shoulder is the result of inflammation, scarring, thickening, and shrinkage of the capsule that surrounds the normal shoulder joint. Long-term immobility of the shoulder joint can put people at risk to develop a frozen shoulder.
It is diagnosed with the help of x-rays and MRI scans. So, see what the latest MRI scan shows. Do you have limited range of motion in all directions or in any one particular direction?
The treatment of a frozen shoulder usually requires an aggressive combination of antiinflammatory medication, cortisone injection(s) into the shoulder, and physical therapy. Diligent physical therapy is often key and can include ultrasound, electric stimulation, range-of-motion exercise maneuvers, ice packs, and eventually strengthening exercises. Physical therapy can take weeks to months for recovery, depending on the severity of the scarring of the tissues around the shoulder. Sometimes  frozen shoulders are resistant to treatment. Patients with resistant frozen shoulders can be considered for release of the scar tissue by arthroscopic surgery or manipulation of the scarred shoulder under anesthesia.
Hope this information helps.
Best.


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