Thyroid Disorders Community
What is the normal rate of increase?
About This Community:

This patient support community is for discussions relating to thyroid issues, goiter, Graves disease, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Human Growth Hormone (HGH), hyperthyroid, hypothyroid, metabolism, parathyroid, pituitary gland, thyroiditis, and thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH).

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

What is the normal rate of increase?

Hey, I just stumbled upon this community from a google search so please if I am posting in the wrong place or the wrong question please let me know and I will fix it.

I (age 23 f ) just got a thyroid test because my family has a history of similar problems. According to the "standard range" I am fine, but my last test was 5 and a half years ago (age 18) and was a full 2 points lower.

Name     =     TSH,BLD,QN
Standard range  =  0.320-5.500 MIU/ML
8/2007  =  1.330
1/2013  = 3.360

My question basically is "is this a normal rate of progression?" and maybe "Does this mean I'm going to be higher than the normal rate in another 5 years?" and basically "should I be worried?"
2 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
First thing to understand is that TSH is totally inadequate as the sole diagnostic for thyroid issues.  It is affected by so many variables, including the time of day when blood is drawn for the test. that at best TSH is only an indicator, to be considered along with more important indicators such as symptoms, and also levels of the biologically active thyroid hormones, Free T3 and Free T4.  Free T3 is the most important because it largely regulates metabolism and many other body functions.  Scientific studies have shown that Free T3 correlated best with hypo symptoms, while Free T4 and TSH did not corerlate at all.

In addition, when there is a question about the possibility of hypothyroidism, it is a good idea to test for Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, which is the most common cause of diagnosed hypothyroidism.  The two tests for the thyroid antibodies of Hashi's are Thyroid peroxidase and Thyroglobulin, identified as TPO ab and TG ab.

Please have a look at this link that lists 26 typical hypo symptoms.  If you find that you have some of those, then rather than wait,  I would suggest that you go ahead and request to be tested for TPO ab and TG ab, along with Free T3 and Free T4 (not the same as Total T3 and T4).  If the doctor resists, then you should insist on them and don't take no for an answer.  While you are at it, it would also be a good idea to test for Vitamin D, B12 and ferritin.  When test results are available, if you will get a copy of the lab report and post results and reference ranges, members will be glad to help interpret and advise further.
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
Sorry, forgot the link.

http://endocrine-system.emedtv.com/hypothyroidism/hypothyroidism-symptoms-and-signs.html
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Thyroid Disorders Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
469720_tn?1388149949
Blank
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-treatable... Blank
Oct 04 by Lee Kirksey, MDBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Thyroid Answerers
Avatar_f_tn
Blank
goolarra
Sisters, OR
649848_tn?1357751184
Blank
Barb135
FL
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
gimel
MI
168348_tn?1379360675
Blank
ChitChatNine
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
flyingfool
WI
798555_tn?1292791151
Blank
LazyMoose
MN