Thyroid Disorders Community
iodine deficiency...
About This Community:

This patient support community is for discussions relating to thyroid issues, goiter, Graves disease, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Human Growth Hormone (HGH), hyperthyroid, hypothyroid, metabolism, parathyroid, pituitary gland, thyroiditis, and thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH).

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

iodine deficiency...

I am so curious to know what other people think about Iodine Deficieny.  Have any of your Doctors talked or tested anybody about it?  I have been reading every article I can find on the internet and am absolutely fascinated.  From my goiter "for no reason", to heart palpitations, to anxiety attacks, apparently can all be fixed if you check out to be iodine deficient, and can get prescription for iodine supplementation.

Just curious, and there is a fascinating article on the web at www.lewrockwell.com/miller/miller20.html

take care all!
Related Discussions
44 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Iodine deficient is hypothyroidism and Iodine deficiency is still the major cause of hypothyroidism in the world.

You can add iodine to your diet by taking supplements, but beware that excessive thyroid function resulting from excess iodine is just as detrimental to the human body as hypothyroidism. Caution should be taken, considering that we are already ingesting large qualities of this mineral because of its presence in fertilizers and table salt and processed foods, etc.

It would be wise for a normal healthy  persons to make sure that they get their daily quota of iodine through foods to avoid any future thyroid problems.  But once hypothyroid, we need our daily thyroid hormoe pill.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
first let me say that I have an enlarged thyroid, but all of my tests come back that I have a happy and healthy thyroid, and this has been going on since 2004.  So, the only conclusion I can come up with is that I am iodine deficient.  So, iodine deficiency is not just hypothyroidism.  I only have a goiter, and heart palpitations from time to time.

And secondly, iodine is not as common in our foods as it used to be.  I am a gourmet cook and therefore use Kosher salt ( no iodine in that), when I do buy bread in the store, I buy Artisan breads (do not have iodine in them), processed breads haven't had iodine in them since the 80's when they switched to using Bromide.  The dairy industry no longer uses Iodine in their production of their foods, and I do not eat eggs (which have varying degrees of iodine depending on how much the hens laying the eggs ingest).  Also, I am a water only drinker, and therefore drink tons of tap water and with the flourification of our water, I am drinking flouride everyday which flouride decreases the absorption of iodine.  Also, since the problems with high blood pressure and hypertension in our country, people are simply not using table salt the way they did years ago.  Besides that, iodized salt doesn't contain anywhere near the degree of iodine it used to.  So, how are we getting all of the iodine that our bodies need.  Women in Japan do not have any of the same health problems as we do, one big difference is they get way more iodine in their diets than we do.  

There are iodine supplements, this I know, but there are great debates as to how much you should be supplementing and I would in no way do it without a doctor's supervision.  But I am fascinated at how so many problems from our thyroids, to breast health, to autism, to heart palpitations could all be linked to something so easy as iodine supplementation.  If you get a chance read that article at lewrockell.com or research "the iodine project" with Dr Abrams, a UCLA Professor.

I really do think and hope that the medical community is onto something huge here, and I was just wondering if anybody's doctors are talking about it yet.  Did you know that iodine supplementation has been shown to completely get rid of breast cancer in laboratory rats?  Completely gone...1 in 8 women in our country develop breast cancer and this staggering statistic just keeps rising.  

Just incredibly hopeful to hear if some doctors out there are investigating this new discovery?

Blank
Avatar_n_tn
sorry to do this again, but...

you said, "iron deficiency is hypothyroidism".  so I should take that to mean, that if you have hypothyroidism, you are indeed iodine deficient.  Then you said "you can take supplements, but be careful because we already get large quantities of iodine in our diets".

So, if we are getting large quantities of iodine in our diets, like you said, then how come we are iodine deficient?  

how come?  
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
I beg your parden!   Gourmet cook or not. Iodine is more common in our food than you would like to think, not to mention soil and  fertilizers as mentioned.  Plus it is natural in a lot of our vegetables, depending where grown.  Dairy farmers use iodine to steralize their dairy equipment so they can use the equimpment faster without any wait, which in turn, gets into our dairy foods.  Reading labels can help, but still not a garantee for here in the US at least, companies are allowed to use a certain percent of a item/ingredient before having to list it on the label.
Not everybody uses  Kosher salt  and we do have the choice of iodize or non-iodize salts plus sea/vegetable salt.  You may not eat eggs but a lot of us do.
We don't need all that much iodine for health and what little we do need, is sufficiently supplied through foods.
Japan has its own set of health problems that we here in the US don't , so I wouldn't brag on them!

I drink, wash foods and cook in distilled water.  I also brush my teeth with non- fluoride tooth paste. I also take a lot of vitamins and minerals and very nutrition conscious. I have to watch my iodine because I am Hyper/Graves'.  When I was young, well, actually up until diagnosed. I used a combo mixture of baby oil and iodine for sun.  Iodine for potential sun damage/infections and baby oil for skin dryness, because I tan real fast and deep.

You know death can come from being too hypo as well as too hyper, especially when not treated.  Its your choice.

It sounds like you are selling something or you just want to debate, will I am not a good debater, so I leave your here, at this point.

Maybe others will take it from here.

Blank
125112_tn?1217277462
Would anybody know if Sea Salt contains as much Iodine as regular Iodized table salt?

We've been using Sea Salt and prior to that...noticed that my last few table salts...were non iodized. Oops.

Personally, I've never been fond of much salt. Which makes me wonder, if I could be a little short on it.
It seems so many processed foods (just one reason I am not fond of it) & restaurants use too much of it.

Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Hi borninquisitive,

you just have to check your label really, really, carefully to see if it has iodine in it.  I have a brand here, not my usual, of Redmond Real Salt, Gourmet Kosher Salt and it says in tiny writing on the back, near the bar code, "this salt does not supply iodide, a necessary nutrient".  I really had to look for this information.  Hope that helps.
Blank
173351_tn?1201217657
The choice about using iodine is totally individual
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Wow, looks like I really made you mad.  Don't know how a simple question did that.  I am not debating with anyone, just asking a simple question.  

If we are getting so much iodine in our diets, then how come people with thyroid problems are iodine deficient?  How does that happen, with all of that iodine intake you are talking about.  And if there was a natural way for us all to get enough iodine in our diets (through healthy eating...eggs, fruits, veggies like you talk about), the government would never have had to ionize table salt to begin with.  

Something has happened...something has changed in our diets...and I for one am looking for an answer as to why it has happened that I am Iodine deficient, so I can then find a cure!!!  I am optimistic and hopeful that there is a cure for all of us, not just a life filled with handing my money over to the doctors and pharmaceutical companies!!!

Blank
125112_tn?1217277462
Ugh! I don't recall seeing anything mentioned on the label (and kids removed it).
We purchased it from Costco and just checked the book. It was McCormicks. I went to McCormick's site...and oh, nope...it doesn't contain any Iodine. This means, that for years, at my table, the salt hasn't contained any Iodine.
Rarely do I have the opportunity to eat out and most foods I cook, is homemade. Foods cookied with little salt...and so I now know, having no Iodine.

Too, I wonder about the soil in which our produce is grown in...depleted and/or with things in the soil I'd rather not want there? Further, our produce is cut short from the growing process as it has to be barged here (Alaskan island.)
Impossible to ship ripe produce, on account of it.

Mind you, I have not been diagnosed. Only a suspicion.

Thank you for causing me to look into things further.

~Kate





Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Hi Jenipeni,

I of course welcome your thoughts or opinions!!!  And, I'll even bet in another year, when schooling is done, you will make a wonderful nurse, and your patients very happy!  You seem to be a very sweet and caring person!

Anyhow, I guess to me the amount of Iodine we need seems inconsequential, because I think you said a teaspoon over a lifetime? (i hope that's right, if not sorry!) compared to how come we are deficient in it.  If that is true that we need so little, then how come we aren't getting enough of it to keep our thyroid's happy?  

Also, I was wondering if you have ever seen the website, www.helpmythyroid.com/iodine.html

this is a family practice Doctor who has done research and clinical trials on iodine deficiency.  I really was wondering your opinion on what you think of the site.  He is a Doctor on the East Coast, no where near me, but I wish they were close, because they have the nicest people answering the phones!!!!  

just curious about your opinion on that.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Hi again, sorry I had posted the other comment before I knew you had questioned Dr Abraham.  

Is the following link legitimate in your opinion?

http://www.optimox.com/pics/Iodine/IOD-05/IOD_05.html

so, sorry too, I know you have a life, this is just very interesting.  

thanks!  abl

By the way when I see articles like the link above they seem so dry, I read them but they have a lot of technical, medical jargon that loses me sometimes.  That is why I tend to like articles like the one that you said didn't have much merit in your opinion.  I'm sure to someone studying to be in the profession, it does seem shady.  I just figure that they are written a bit more for people who aren't, to keep our interest.
Blank
173351_tn?1201217657
Hi again,

At a quick glance and skim over this site looks quite promising and on the level.  Some but not all .com sites are okay but to be safe always test the information they present - as you should with info presented on a forum (mine included, I'm not infallible - human afterall!).

My fear is that people in situations such as we are (looking for answers and ways to feel well) are vulnerable to anyone who touts that they have all/some of the answers.  I don't know about you but I don't have money to waste BUT in the same breath I would pay dearly to have a cure/improvement.  It's a vulnerable place to be regardless.

I hadn't really heard much about the association between iodine and fibrocystic breast disease - so I did a quick search at my Uni's library (we get access to top journal articles etc that you normal require a subscription to view).  Anyways it seems to be a widely researched topic - thanks for that, I learn't something new!
I think I owe someone else on another thread an apology now.  Good thing I don't mind a bit of humble pie!

Thank-you for your kind sentiments!  That's really nice of you.

I love it when people such as yourself (and everyone else here on the forum) do research of thier own and take an avid interest in thier health and wellbeing.  Keep up the good work.  I'm planning to continue learning until I go into the grave!!!  I love it, you never get bored and there's always something new!

Iodine is a major contributor but by far not the only thing that can disrupt the happiness of our thyroids.  Auto-immune problems for one.  On the other hand the endocrine system is so complex, I believe there is still a lot to be learnt about how it all interconnects. It is no secret that Thyroid problems often co-incide with other hormonal situations such as pregnancy and menopause - which is also why women have a much higher incidence of thyroid disease.  Stress, viruses, and cigarette smoking have also been linked with thyroid disease.  And I'm sure there are others... the list goes on.

Best wishes on your journey to health and wellness.
jenipeni



Blank
173351_tn?1201217657

The site I referred to in my last post was
www.helpmythyroid.com/iodine.html

I put in the address for the other one
http://www.optimox.com/pics/Iodine/IOD-05/IOD_05.html

While my eyes glazed over from the format of the document (hard to read apart from being technical) it is written to a better standard - but I didn't read it sorry.

I am still very dubious though - if you reduce the address to;
http://www.optimox.com

You'll find they are trying to sell supplements - there is nothing wrong with supplements in general BUT...
remember there are no magical cures - and many companies make hollow promises.  

What is your thyroid diagnosi/suspicion?  Have you had thyroid tests? Do you take thyroid hormone?

If you suffer from fatigue the very best supplement I can recommend is a liquid or effervescent Vitamin B complex.  Our bodies don't store Vitamin B and our daily diets are often low in it - the very best source is bananans (also known as brain food!).  Be aware your wee will go yellow when you take it.  Lots of companies make similar formulations and you can get it just about anywhere - that' a good sign.  Most people will benefit from B complex supplements at some time or another... times of stress, times of physical exertion etc.  The liquid/effervescent form is good because you get the benefit more quickly as your body doesn't have to waste energy on breaking down a tablet.

If fatigue is an issue have an iron test and test for other types of anaemias which are other common causes of fatigue in menstruating women.

Remember supplements are usually useful ONLY if you were deficient in the first place.  

jenipeni
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
My story is simple... I have no other symptoms other than a goiter and heart palpitations.  All of my thyroid levels and bloodwork and neck  and heart ultrasounds come back as saying, nothing is wrong.  By the way, that has been for 2 years now.

I really am very healthy, other than trying to figure out these two problems.  I am only worried about the whole early detection, early cure thing, because my OB/GYN thought she noticed a slightly enlarged thyroid in 2004, which is when my heart palp's started. And now, 3 years later, you can feel it, which means it is growing.  And do you know no one told me your thyroid controls your heart rate!  So, on my own I have put the two things together.  

Anyhow, thanks for your interest.  I eat ridiculously well, have never smoked, do not even drink caffeine of any kind, no alcohol, water only, I put flax oil in my (oraginc fruit only) smoothie everyday, which happens to include a heart healthy banana.  I make sure I eat at least 4 fruits and four different kinds veggies a day too.  I do yoga, guided meditation, cardio and strenght training workouts everyday.  I go to bed around 10:00 and wake at 5:45 am, and am ridiculously, happily married to the most wonderful man in the world.  I am a lucky girl, just want my body to be all right before we try the whole pregnancy thing.

Simple request for all that I do for my body!


Anyhow also, the nutritional website Opti-whatever, is Dr Abraham's.  He is doing that now, instead of teaching at UCLA.  The help my thyroid website DR, did the study under/for Dr Abraham.  And the lewrockwell website with all of the breast info, is from a Dr Donald W Miller, Jr currently on the teaching staff at the University of Washington.  
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
thanks jenipeni!

My sentiments exactly, I would not dream of iodine supplementation without a Dr's help, because I have read of cases like your sis-in-laws.  And I do want to start now, while I still only have a goiter, not any other signs of hypo/hyper.  Sorry too, that you didn't hear about this 10 years ago, like you said.  

Also, I appreciate the warning, but I am aware of all of the weird articles and info out there on the web.  It's just that I thought it was a great article (which could also make people hopeful) that did reference Dr Guy Abraham's findings accurately.  (By the way, Dr Abraham used to teach and practice at UCLA Med School, so I believe him to be reputable)

thanks again though, for your kind response! ;0)  

still hopeful...abl
    
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
A person might be hypo from other reasons than lack of iodine.  In the US its almost unheard of now days for people to be hypo from lack of iodine (iodine deficient) because it is very plentiful here. In other parts of the world there is iodine deficient thyroids, with huge goiters that would scare the living daylights out of you.
If you eat, you probably are not iodine deficient. On the other hand, you just might be hypothyroid.

Blank
125112_tn?1217277462
"Something has happened...something has changed in our diets...and I for one am looking for an answer as to why it has happened that I am Iodine deficient, so I can then find a cure!!! I am optimistic and hopeful that there is a cure for all of us, not just a life filled with handing my money over to the doctors and pharmaceutical companies!!!"

It would seem to me, we are cut from the same cloth. I too have many questions...you have to ask, "Why?" Whatever catches my attention and I don't understand, have the compulsion to investigate.

Having said that, I suspect many on these forums are the same. Especially those suffering from a chronic condition.

Anyway...I would say, may things have probably contributed to our health.
Blank
125112_tn?1217277462
"In other parts of the world there is iodine deficient thyroids, with huge goiters that would scare the living daylights out of you."

Or...wow...google "goiter" under "images." My jaw dropped.
Blank
173351_tn?1201217657
Can I offer another opinion in answer to this question?

If we are getting so much iodine in our diets, then how come people with thyroid problems are iodine deficient?

We all eat such different diets to one another.  Especially with the obesity epidemic of western countries, it seems a lot of people are eating more and more junk food which is nearly always low in nutrient value.  Also some people grow their own vegetables in their back-yard in soil which may be iodine deficient (tip- get seaweed to use as a soil conditioner/mulch).

Some countries have/are moving to only allow iodised salt to be used.  The iodisation of salt has been found as the most effective way to dose and disperse iodine to the general population.  The thing is - it is only a tiny tiny amount that is required for normal thyroid function over a lifetime.  Just one teaspoon of iodine per person for a lifetime.  That is sooo small!!!

I live in Australia so I don't know what it's like where you live but here there might be one or two iodised salts on the shelf at the supermarket - compared to 20 or more other salts which are not iodised.  Most commercially prepared foods here do not contain iodine either.

I appreciate your optimism for finding a cure for all of us and life's ails but I'm afraid it is just too simplistic that their is only one cause for all thyroid and other problems.  And indeed it is an incredible stretch to say that it is also responsible for all breast cancers, autism, and heart palpitations.  

If you do some research into cancers it has been proven that even the same type of cancer, for example breast cancer has different variations, different evolutions/stimulating factors (eg. estrogen) and causes.  What causes each of these variables is the million dollar question.  It has been proven though that there is not just one cause.

In the study you mention about mice and breast cancer, did it mention any adverse effects on the mice due to increased iodine levels?  It has been proven that high iodine levels are also as bad for you as low levels.  Another case of case of; does the risk and potential side effects outweight the benefit?   I don't know about you but I wouldn't be putting my hand up to be the guinea pig for the human trials - if it gets that far.

I in my final year training as a nurse - all my biology/anatomy and physiology text books say that the thyroid gland is the only part of the body to make use of iodine (although it is absorbed and distributed throughout the bloodstream).  I have confirmed this in conversations by email with one of Australia's leading endocrinologists who deals with iodine deficiency disorder all the time.  

This is what I mean about being careful where you get your information from - it is incorrect that any other part of the body (apart from your thyroid gland) actually uses iodine.

It is also common knowledge that when used topically (on the skin) iodine has excellent anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties - hence this is why surgeons use it as a skin preparation in surgery.  

You are right something has happened... our lives now are very different to our forfathers.  We have so many more chemicals and exposure to much higher levels of psychological stress.  But even before all that they still got cancers and other conditions, many of which went undetected.  Who can say what is the cause of it all?  If there was only one cause it would have been quite apparent and would have been detected before now.

When I have an opinion I am happy to go back and forth and talk about (or debate) such things.  

Don't lose that optimism!!!
CHeers!
jenipeni
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Let me set you straight, you did not make me mad. LOL!
I don't even know you. LOL!
And you are debating. LOL!
I believe that you are using the wrong word(s).
You should refere to, thyroid hormone deficient.

You are debating with the wrong person.
I am hyperthyroid - I have too much.

God bless the doctors and pharmaceutical companies, for a lot of people would be dead by now with out them.  
And I do thank God everyday, for many things.

Regards,
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Did you see these - Scroll 1/4 ways down
http://www.pathguy.com/lectures/thyroid.htm

This is what thyroid nodule/goiter looks like raw.  I have lots of legit site but these two were faster to get the link too.
http://escuela.med.puc.cl/paginas/Cursos/tercero/AnatomiaPatologica/Imagenes_AP/patologia921-927.html

Good reasons too make sure our thyroids are taken care of
proprly.
Blank
173351_tn?1201217657
Your story sounds kinda similar to mine - goitre first detected around 17-18 years.  Always normal labs.  Told all that could be done was monitor it.  10 years later (Nov 06) I had TT for obstructive multinodular goitre becasue it continued to grow.

Have you looked into the reasearch that thyroxine supplementation with early goitre can also reduce size?  Studies show that goitre growth rates are usually between 5-10% per year.  But not everyone fits in the normal case scenario's - lucky me!  But being young you have a long time to keep monitoring it, which is a frustrating thing.  

Now I am looking to the future just like you, making sure I do everything I should for a healthy pregnancy (in the future - not quite ready yet).  It is very important we get increased requriements of iodine during pregnancy for the baby and it's developing thyroid.  Deficiency during pregnancy results in cretanism which is irreversible and very sad (also associated with low IQ) - google it.  I have found the amount of iodine recommended for pregnancy varies considerably between sources, so I wont quote any.

Sounds like you are doing everything else possible under the sun (or just about) to keep fit and healthy!  Well done!

When it comes to the heart and what sets heart rate, it is much more complicated than thyroid alone - good thing your doctor has looked into other causes.  

Heart rate is affected by the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems; neurotransmitters of which are adrenaline and acetylcholine, electrolyes; cheifly calcium, sodium and potassium, Blood volume or lack therof, body temperature, gender, exercise, physiological health of the heart muscles and valves.... the lists goes on.

THis is what my Anatomy & Physiology book says on thyroxine and heart rate;
"Thyroxine is a thyroid gland hormone that increases metabolic rate and body heat production.  When released in large quantities, it causes a slower but more sustained increase in heart rate than that caused by adrenaline.  Because thyroxine also enhances the effect of adrenaline on the heart, chronically hyperthyroid individuals may develop a weakened heart."

Even though it doesn't explain your palpitations I thought you might find that interesting.

Good that you found that extra info on Dr Abraham and Dr Donald W Miller, Jr.   In the end it's up to you if you want to go with their info!

Did you ever have blood tests for autoimmune thyroid antibodies?  Might be an idea.  Even if you are positive for antibodies though - they still only treat you based on the thyroid function test results.

Cheers
Jenipeni

  
Blank
173351_tn?1201217657
Don't go overboard using the iodised salt like using more than you would normally (or using supplements which contain iodine/kelp)

sorry - pressed post before I meant to!!
Blank
173351_tn?1201217657
abl

(By the way, Dr Abraham used to teach and practice at UCLA Med School, so I believe him to be reputable)


Mmm... this does not mean much to me personally.  I'm do not mean to discredit the guy - but don't believe everything you read.  If the article was posted on the UCLA site or the UCLA site listed Dr Abraham as one of their staff then the story could be different.  But still how would you know if someone else was posting on this site under his name?  This info needs to be backed up.  If I said that I was a professor at a leading University would you just believe me? (obviously I'm not).

There is some sound info in this article BUT some is very iffy.  Again it's just my opionion but please dont rely on this article as a reputable source.

The other thing is that the article is not written according to usual medical scholarly/journal style.  It is normal to include references for supporting ideas and studies.  There is no proper reference list at all - and the recommended reading list doesn't count.

At uni we have to first critique any article we think about using in reference in an assigment/paper.  We are given a percentage of marks just based on the quality of our references used alone.  I wouldn't touch this article with a barge pole.

Also it is my understanding that unless the label clearly states IODISED SALT you can pretty much bet that it isn't.  Even though sea salt comes from the sea and the sea contains iodine - I believe it is not considered as iodised salt unless it has gone the process.  

EVERYONE use iodised salt!!! GET THE MESSAGE OUT - TELL YOUR FAMILY AND FREINDS!
Blank
125112_tn?1217277462
Indeed! I had seen those pictures. Wow-ee!
Blank
125112_tn?1217277462
"The thing is - it is only a tiny tiny amount that is required for normal thyroid function over a lifetime. Just one teaspoon of iodine per person for a lifetime."

I just looked at the back of Morton's iodized salt and it reads 1/4 tsp is equivilent to 45% RDA. If this is recommended, how is it that only 1 tsp in one person's lifetime is sufficient for thyroid?

The number seems too small to be true. [?]
Blank
173351_tn?1201217657
It's one teaspoon of iodine (not sure what the strength of the solution in this example) - not one teaspoon of iodised salt.

I saw a program which showed the machine which makes the salt iodised - basically the salt passes on a conveyor belt under a big spray head which adds the iodine to the salt.  (I'm sure there are different machines out there). The show was about the cretanism and iodised salt in Tibet.  In Tibet they have traditionally had very high rates of cretanism and goitre because the rural people mine and trade raw salt (which contains no iodine).  So even though it is proving difficult they are beginning to make a big difference to the quality of many people's lives.  Very hard though because esentially mining the raw salt is part of many rural people's livlihood.  A much bigger problem than just iodising salt.  

But it is sooo important if many hundreds of thousands of babies brains can be saved from cretanism - which is irreversible and results from low iodine in the mother while carrying the baby in the womb.  Cretans are severely disabled and do not have the same opportunity or quality of life they have the potential for if their mother just had access to iodine during pregnancy.  

The iodisation of salt and our varied diet has pretty much wiped out the occurance of cretanism in western countries.  I believe the higher the altitude you live the less access to foods that naturally contain iodine - eg. farther away from the sea.

THis is a little more info than you asked for but I Hope this clears it up
jenipeni
Blank
173351_tn?1201217657

The following info is an excerpt from the 'International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorder'

A teaspoon of iodine is all a person requires in a lifetime, but because iodine cannot be stored for long periods by the body, tiny amounts are needed regularly.

http://indorgs.virginia.edu/iccidd/aboutidd.htm
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Iodized salt provides 76 micrograms (mcg) of iodine per gram of salt.

Normal daily recommended intakes in mcg for iodine for :

Adolescent and Males Adults 150 U.S. and 125
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Iodine deficiency in the United States is rare because iodine is added to table salt. Most people get enough salt from the foods they eat, without adding salt to their meals. Iodine deficiency is a problem in other areas of the world.

1,000 mcg of iodine is in the average American fast food diet.

A 1/4 teaspoon of iodized table salt provides 95 micrograms of iodine. A 6-ounce portion of ocean fish provides 650 micrograms of iodine. Most people are able to meet the daily recommendations by eating seafood, iodized salt, and plants grown in iodine-rich soil. When buying salt make sure it is labeled "iodized."

Utilisation of iodine from different sources in pigs.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10849870&dopt=Abstract

Sources of dietary iodine: bread, cows' milk, and infant formula ...
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15240625&dopt=Abstract

Iodine-rich foods
http://www.nnc.da.gov.ph/nutfacts/nutqty/iodine.html
Most of it comes from what we eat and drink. Seafood is usually a good source because the ocean contains considerable iodine. Freshwater fish reflect the iodine content of the water where they swim, which may be deficient. Cod, sea bass, haddock, and perch are good sources. Other foods vary tremendously in iodine content, depending on their source and what may have been added. Plants grown in iodine-deficient soil do not have much iodine, nor do meat or other products from animals fed on iodine-deficient plants. Because the breast concentrates iodine, dairy products are usually a good source, but only if the cows get enough iodine.

Iodine exposure can come from many other sources. Certain food colorings (e.g., erythrosine) contain iodine, although it is only partially bioavailable. Some iodine from skin disinfectants, such as povidone iodine, is absorbed and reaches the bloodstream. Certain health foods, such as some types of kelp, contain large amounts of iodine. Other sources are dyes used for contrast in X-ray procedures and medicines, such as Amiodarone (used for heart failure and abnormal heart rhythm). People also get iodine from its use in farm animals, for cleansing udders or as part of iodine-containing medicines. Iodate has been used as a bread stabilizer in commercial baking, although this practice is less common now. Many other environmental sources of iodine exist; most of them are unrecognized or unpublicized.

Many hidden sources of iodine make this a near impossible feat. Besides iodized salt, iodine is present in many medicines, such as the heart medicine amiodarone. Furthermore, iodine is a component of most multi-vitamin and mineral preparations. Iodine is used in the care and feeding of animals, as a stabilizer, and/or safety element in food processing, and it is a component of food dyes. The richest sources of iodine include kelp, seaweed, iodized salt, dairy products, fish, processed meats, pudding mixes, candies, frozen dinners,
Blank
125112_tn?1217277462
For whatever reason, I see the first post...but none thereafter.
Blank
173351_tn?1201217657
Yeah I had that yesterday too - today seems normal.  
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Since we are still on the topic.  I just got back from the Doctors, and he says I am completely healthy, my thyroid is completely normal.  So, I remind him to check my thyroid ultrasound (which he had forgotten about) and once found he said, "Oh you have a multinodular goiter."  So, I said, "how did that happen?"  He said, we don't know.  that's like a stomach cancer paitient asking why? we just don't know these things."  So I said, isn't a goiter caused by Iodine deficiency?  He said, "only in countries with poor nutrition and blah, blah, blah."  So I said, well can I be tested to see if I am iodine deficient, just in case?  He said, "no".  So I asked why not, and he said, there is no testing for it.  Now then, in CAM facilities (that are state regulated and registered) they can do an iodine deiciency test.  And there is a family practice Dr, in SC that them in his practice.  So, why aren't other Doctors.  Also, a Naturopathic Dr (Dr Brownstein) has found that in testing over 500 of his patients that 94% are iodine deficient.  These patients are American, living in the USA on the same soil that is supposedly so rich with iodine, and yet they are deficient in iodine.  Doesn't it make any of you wonder?  So, check out this website if you all have the time or want to.

http://www.iodine4health.com/ortho/flechas.htm

I have found a Dr that does iodine deficiency testing, but he is a little far away, so I am looking for someone closer, and it's not that easy to find.

By teh way borninquisitive, I absolutely love Alaska!!!  One of the most beautiful and spectacular places I have ever been!!!
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I think it's a bit rediculous to be so afraid of taking more iodine when the Japanese ingest 100 times the amount that Americans and have far less hormonal, cancer, heart problems.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I should have said the Japanese ingest 100 times the iodine than we in the U.S because of their fish diet.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
I am always so annoyed when MD's turn their collective noses up at supplementation when in medical school the course on nutrition is about 3 weeks long. The least the doctors could do was to look into some of the truly good research and some of the double blind studies done by reputable scientists and doctors.  I am truly sick of the arrogance.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
The Japanese get their iodine thru food sources which I would suspect is much different than supplements.  Instead of taking iodine thru supplements just try eating a lot more fish.
Blank
425199_tn?1313072597
I know little about iodine deficiency, but I do think it's more common in food than we realize.  I just got my list of foods to avoid when on the low-iodine diet (pre-RAI), and it is substantial.  One of the biggest food categories to avoid is dairy, as well as all seafood.  I think you'd be surprised how easy it is to add iodine to your diet naturally - no (unregulated) supplements necessary.  

Blank
398849_tn?1210139572
I have been following this line of conversation and you all have done some homework on the subject. Two things that I have come across 1) increase in thryriod problems in people and cats since the 1980's. Research for cats have shown it is 1) pop top cans - nasty additive sealant used under lids is a major suspect in cats 2) Amalgam fillings in  with mercury in humans. Both very high on the list for thyriod problems and a heap of other side effect list most of the problems I am reading on this website.
We are all taking excellent care of our health like myself and all of a sudden we are strickened with something like hypothryriod. Being so health consious we want to take control of our illness and fix it. Not like what is happening to us going through the medical profession. Normally we are having to maintain it for the rest of our lives not fix it. That is why we are all searching and trying for a cure. I have decided to take kelp tablets but only one a day. My research says that it is one of the natural ingredients that would assist and I must say that most of my borderline hypothyriodism has disappeared from the first week. But I was also low in iron and have taken a iron/calcium combination so that could have also assisted.
I like most of you use sea salt and no other salt in my cooking. Most of my food is from my own garden or hen house. I do not eat any bread but do have cearal with honey in the morning. I am mortified with what they are doing with bread. My theory is if something doesn't go moldy within a day or two I will not eat it.
I very seldom eat anything that doesn't look like it did when it was alive. No reconstituted meats, prepacked foods or tinned foods especially with pop top cans.
All I can say is there is a cause out there and we will one day find out what that is and when we do we can cure it. So keep digging....
Blank
398849_tn?1210139572
Good morning this came on my email today. No wonder everyone is having funny side effects most americans could be receiving such a chemical cocktail from their drinking water.
Quote...Yesterday, an article published by the Associated Press (AP) exploited the presence of several drugs in drinking water around the country.

The residue of several drugs including sex hormones, antibiotics, antidepressants, and other drugs have been found in the water at several water facilities across the country.
  
According to the AP, they tested a sampling of different waters that supply over 41 million Americans much of which had drug residue.  If the water supplies millions of people, this means it also supplies millions of pets.


Does this water pose a risk to cats?
Unquote....my questions is does it pose a risk to humans especially those on other medications or the old and frail....
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
You also need to be aware that the fluoride added to the toothpaste slows down the thyroid function.
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
wifi (wireless) can cause hormone disruption and heart palpations, among other things, including cordless phones.  see  www.weepinitiative.org (talking to your doctor) and www.magdahavas.com
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Thyroid Disorders Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Thyroid Answerers
168348_tn?1379360675
Blank
ChitChatNine
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
gimel
MI
649848_tn?1357751184
Blank
Barb135
FL
Avatar_f_tn
Blank
goolarra
Sisters, OR
657231_tn?1390151580
Blank
rumpled
Northern, NJ
1204245_tn?1356904325
Blank
898_1
Long Beach