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Chronic prostatitis
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Chronic prostatitis

I am 70 years old in good condition---e.g. lots of gym work and cardiovascular treadmill and Stairmaster work, and I am of normal weight etc. For the last couple of years I have had periodic prostate problems. I have a consistent PSA of 0.5 -- 0.8. DREs show lesions on the left lobe of the prostate---the lesions I think have been noted by physicians for years and therefore semm to be nothing new. Urine samples showed no bacterial infection. A biopsy was once attempted but my reaction was violent and it was aborted. Three samples were obtained and they were negative but the biopsy was on the "good" side of the prostate. It was then decided that watch and wait was the best course. The problem initially was swelling with slow urination. Flomax was administered. The condition, which sometimes was accompanied by brief periods of back pain,  would go away on its own. The last time it flared up I was put on Bactrim for one month. I also take beta-sitosterol routinely.This condition has recurred two or three times over the course of 18 months. As a routine follow-up I am slated for a sonogram in a couple of weeks. In the meantime the condition has recurred, this time with unremitting low back pain and slow urination as well. The diagnosis has prostatitis/prostadynia. So the simple question is: is the back pain "normal" for a benign, non-cancerous prostate condition?


This discussion is related to prostadynia?.
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Hi,

Back pain can occur due to involvement of any of the organs and structures that are supplied by the nerves to the pelvis. This pain can occur along a single nerve root or be referred to the branches of nerves arising form the main nerve, and can cause pain in the organs and tissues supplied by those nerves. For example, prostatitis can cause pain in the penis and the testicles due to their innervation by the pudendal nerve which also supplies parts of the prostate.

Chronic prostatitis can cause pain in the back as well as along the upper part of the thighs.

You may need to have another urinalysis done, preferably from a sample collected just after ejaculation. A prostate fluid analysis can also be done. This is to identify the organism causing the infection and may be followed by a culture sensitivity test to determine which antibiotic the organism is sensitive to. A prostate ultrasound (done rectally) will give an idea of the state of the gland and whether it is enlarged.

Antibiotic therapy is prescribed for long durations in prostate infections in view of the poor permeability of the prostate gland to antibiotics. The course will be for about 15-21 days and may even be for a few weeks.

Ensure that you keep your fluid intake over 2000 ml per day and avoid prostate irritants, such as caffeine, alcohol, citrus fruits, and spicy foods. Also avoid sitting for long periods of time or on surfaces that are not well padded.

If you do indulge in intercourse during the period of treatment, ensure that you practise safe sex (condoms) so as to not infect your partner.

Do keep us posted on your doubts and progress.
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