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What is this faint grey disk in my right eye when blinking?

Hi, so, at the beginning of June, I noticed something in my vision. When blinking, this perfect round, light greyish disk appears in my right eye vision. It is located slightly to the side of my central vision, and slightly down. It's about the size of a table tennis ball. It immediately disappears after blinking, and generally I see it in lower lit conditions; These symptoms are apparently a symptoms of Macular Degeneration! Oh dear - I'm just 16!

However, co-incidentally, I was having some issues with a floater increase at the same time, So I'd had a dilated eye exam just 2 days before I noticed this disk. In the last few weeks and days I've also had Retina photography, visual field test, and another non-dilated eye exam. All clear. (I've had all these tests because I have severe health anxiety). And, of course, I'm a little worried about this greyish circle - which I hadn't thought of for a while but just remembered it again and can't help seeing it now blinking. If I blink constantly I can get a better view of it. I've been referred to ophthalmologist, again for a reason completely unrelated to this, (but at least I can bring this up)

Do I need to worried here? Is something serious happening? I'm very young for a Macular issue and I've had the eye exams and the retina photography. Anyone got an explanation?
1 Responses
233488 tn?1310696703
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Generally no. After the tests you've had with the Eye MD it is not likely anything serious.  Most likely it is your anxiety disorder talking to you through your eyes.  This is a common observation,  I can create it also in my eyes.  It is generally an afterimage, pressure phosphene or other entopic phenomena.
6 Comments
Thank for the response Doctor. This grey disk is certainly very real. My anxiety is saying "this must be an early sign of a Macular Degeneration I'll get in 20 years". Aside from anxiety, is there anything at all that could be doing this? I am seeing an Ophthalmologist in the coming weeks/months, but It's certainly very tense waiting for those answers. It's just in the right, and slightly aside from the centre - seems so strange!
Also, I can't create the same thing in the left. Just a table tennis ball sized greyish, translucent circle in the right...
Your conclusions make no sense at all. Deal with the anxiety not the symptoms they create. No tests or symptoms tell what the eye will do in 20 years.
I am still concerned I have to say. And now, in that eye, every time I blink I have this tiny tiny dot appearing, then disappearing. I've actually had this before, then it went after a few days - but it has been 4 days now. Appearing when I move the eye or blink, and only sometimes. It will instantly disappear. I co-incidentally noticed it after I was putting something in a garage and sunlight was brightly reflecting off the white paint of the garage door, perhaps this is just my hypochondria at work, or has damage been done?
Indeed, it is a very tiny dot in my right eye. I can rarely see it when I'm trying to but usually appears against bright surfaces, fixated in the same position, close to central vision. I'm hoping this is a floater and not damage? It's making me very paranoid as it hasn't resolved - but I know I've had something similar.
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