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pain and hepatitis

I have had hepatitis c for a year and a half now i started to experience joint pain about 6 months after i was was infected i was told these are common symptoms of hepatitis i have resorted to taking alot of otc pain meds tylenol advil etc also i have been taking naproxen it has failed to work i am in chronic pain in my knees hands hips and wrists and need to know if it is safe or even logical to be perscribed a opiate based pain killer for pain .i am not a drug user i used a little bit of pot in my time that is about it i believe i got this disease from a cellmate of mine when i was incarcerated a mix up of razors i believe or maybe even from the jailhouse tattoos i received while in their i am not sure. all i know for a fact is i need somthing to combat  this chronic pain and fatigue


This discussion is related to High Liver Enzymes Quick Change.
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Avatar universal
Hello friend, please consider that taking "pain meds tylenol advil etc" are "harsh" for the liver.  Consider your diet, do you drink soda pop? Have a sweet tooth? Eat fast foods? etc...  Take care of your body [liver] in the right way for an easier time of it.    God bless!!  
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87972 tn?1322661239
Sorry to hear you’re dealing with problems; best to consult your physician. For now, you can probably continue with acetaminophen; use as per package directions, and you’ll probably be fine until your doctor can help manage your pain. Here’s an article on HCV and Tylenol:

Jorge L. Herrera M.D.
Division of Gastroenterology
University of South Alabama College of Medicine
Mobile AL

http://www.hcvadvocate.org/hcsp/articles/Herrera.html

“Acetaminophen use: Contrary to popular belief, acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol®) is perfectly safe for patients with cirrhosis as long as it is used cautiously. Any person who drinks alcohol regularly should not consume any acetaminophen. For patients with early cirrhosis (CPT class A or B), the use of acetaminophen is safe as long as the recommended dose is not exceeded (1,000 mg per dose, repeated no more often than every 6 hours). Patients with more advanced cirrhosis should take only ½ of the recommended dose. In fact, for patients with cirrhosis, acetaminophen, when used as described, is the preferred medication for the treatment of pain.”

Please disregard the site www.cancertutor.com referenced by ‘hobo’ above; for the most part, it’s nonsence without published, peer-reviewed support. From the article cited:

“Many, if not all, of the large AIDS organizations are in bed with the pharmaceutical industry. The executives of these non-profit organizations may get very handsome salaries, or other benefits, from Big Pharma. These organizations persecute and lie about effective treatments for AIDS so that Big Pharma can make many billions of dollars from the insurance of AIDS patients.
A similar situation exists in the cancer industry. ALL of the large "cancer research" organizations are fed money from the bottomless pit of money of the pharmaceutical industry. They are not looking for a cure for cancer, they are looking for part of the money pit of Big Pharma.
Ditto for all large charity organizations related to health, such as the "March of Dimes."
AIDS is a highly profitable "disease" for Big Pharma and the medical community. It is one of the diseases, like cancer, heart disease and diabetes, that is so profitable there is absolutely no interest in orthodox medicine finding a cure. In fact, there are many very well documented cures for AIDS that have been suppressed, and even persecuted, by the medical cartel and their cronies in government.”

Huh? Is this guy for real? This is gibberish, and shouldn’t be cited in here.

Bill
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