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Life after a Stroke

My husband, age 53, had a brain stem stroke approximately 7 months ago.  He actually had a mild stroke compared to everything I have read on other forums.  He was fine when he first woke up that day, but within 30 minutes he had double vision, then he fell into a deep sleep where I could not arouse him.  I then called 911 and he was transported to the hospital.  When he became awake that day, he had difficulty with mobility on his left side.  That all subsided within 24 hours.  But he was left with double vision, a fogginess in his brain (we were told not to use dizzy/light headedness), his taste was affected (i.e. sweet tastes bitter, sometimes tongue goes numb), and his sleep center was affected, he wants to close his eyes and sleep all the time.  

He has gone back to work, he has a job that requires looking at a computer screen 8 hours a day and most days it is very frustrating.

The neurologist has been of very little help, really no other advice than take care of yourself in the hopes that it doesn't happen again.  

My question is has anyone else had these symptoms, will he fully recover?  The eye specialist is impressed with the progress with his eyesight, but the sleepiness, fogginess, taste persists.  Will these symptoms improve also?  If so, what timeframe?
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