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TS, ADHD, Seizure Disorder

Our child was diagnosed with ADHD, TS, and Seizure Disorder.  Our child does have facial twitching, shoulder shrugs, and various other things, as well as ADD symptoms like daydreaming in class, not completing assignments, being forgetful, etc.  I could list them all but I'm sure that's really necessary.

They did an EEG and blood work and urine tests to rule out other things such as lead and copper and such.

Can anyone please help to explain all this and why it's so much - or are they all related?
1 Responses
368886 tn?1466238884
MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL
Hello.

This is an important issue. Your child is one of the many children who suffer from Tourette's syndrome with co-existing conditions such as attention deficit disorder and seizures.

There have been debates for ages about what could possibly be a common cause. No one has ever been able to give a satisfactory explanation. A recent researcher (Grimaldi) has hypothesized that Magnesium deficiency ma play a central role in all the three diseases. According to him, Magnesium deficiency leads to the many biochemical effects and changes in substance P and vitamin B6 functions.

The current knowledge allows us to treat the three conditions separately. But this does not prevent us from treating them effectively.

Is your child's ADD affecting his academic performance? And are the seizures controlled?

I would appreciate if you can write the symptoms.

Regards
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