Thyroid Disorders Community
sweating and the thyroid
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This patient support community is for discussions relating to thyroid issues, goiter, Graves disease, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Human Growth Hormone (HGH), hyperthyroid, hypothyroid, metabolism, parathyroid, pituitary gland, thyroiditis, and thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH).

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sweating and the thyroid

My doctor says my thyroid levels are within normal.  Even if thyroid levels seem normal when tested, is it still possible to have a hypothyroid?  I have profuse sweating and  feel hot most of the time, even when everyone else is fine or even cold.  If I do the least bit of moving around, I sweat.  Sometimes even if I'm not moving, but deep into solving a problem or working on something not physical, I sweat.  My sweating is all over my body.  It runs in  my eyes and makes it difficult to continue whatever activity I'm into. Once I get hot, it is very difficult to cool down.  Sometimes I have a low-grade fever.  I've had all kinds of blood tests but found nothing.  I'm also tired all the time, feel weak, dizzy upon rising, have difficulty sleeping, have hagh blood pressure (Taking meds for), and have been suffering from depression (also taking meds for and had counseling).  I have IBS and ringing in my ears sometimes.  I know at least some of these stmptoms go along with hypothroidism.  Is this a possibility?  I'm desperate to find help.
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1050938_tn?1311557178
If you haven't gotten yourself to an Endocrinologist, now might be a good time to do so. Far from a slow thyroid, you're exhibiting symptoms that could be tied to Thyrotoxicosis, or HyPERthyroidism, where you have too much thyroid activity going on and your cell metabolism is working constantly at breakneck speed to keep up with itself. The definition of "normal" thyroid levels tends to change depending on who you ask. Some say 1-3 is a good range, others say 2 - 5, and so on. The bottom line is, if your health and well-being is under threat even though the first few tests come out "normal", that doesn't mean you're not ill. It means you need to keep trying until you find a physician who is willing to work with you to help find the right test that will give you the answers you need, even if it takes months.
Don't give up! Your health is worth it!
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1050938_tn?1311557178
If you haven't gotten yourself to an Endocrinologist, now might be a good time to do so. Far from a slow thyroid, you're exhibiting symptoms that could be tied to Thyrotoxicosis, or HyPERthyroidism, where you have too much thyroid activity going on and your cell metabolism is working constantly at breakneck speed to keep up with itself. The definition of "normal" thyroid levels tends to change depending on who you ask. Some say 1-3 is a good range, others say 2 - 5, and so on. The bottom line is, if your health and well-being is under threat even though the first few tests come out "normal", that doesn't mean you're not ill. It means you need to keep trying until you find a physician who is willing to work with you to help find the right test that will give you the answers you need, even if it takes months.
Don't give up! Your health is worth it!
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1013194_tn?1296463081
I have Hashi/Hypo on 100mcg a day thyroxine..I constantly sweat, day and night, i wake every hour just about soaked through..But im also  Perimenopause and this makes it so hard to distinguish between the two..
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Avatar_f_tn
First of all, thank you for your response.  I am confused though.  I thought what I might have is HyPOthyroidism, not HyPER.  Since I am overweight, I thought HyPO would be a better fit.  I have considered going to an Endocrinologist but have not followed up.  If you suffer from this, you know how misersble it can be.  I'm going to ask my doctor about seeing an Endo.  If he is not receptive, and can't come up with a solution, then I will seek help from an Endo on my own.  Again, thank you for caring.  I won't give up.
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Avatar_f_tn
I have never heard of Hashi/Hypo but will look it up.  If you're still having all those symptoms AND you're already taking something for your problems, do you have hope of getting better?  Apparently this type of problem is very difficult to diagnose, and more difficult to cure.  I have been having these symptoms for several years and am so tired of dealing with them.  But I haven't given up.   Thank you again , and good luck to you in the future.
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1050938_tn?1311557178
A thyroid condition cannot be diagnosed on weight alone. 20th century physicians, once they discovered that thyroid levels CAN impact weight, began prescribing thyroid extracts as a WEIGHT LOSS pill to their overweight /obese patients, regardless of what their natural thyroid levels were. What they realized too late is that the administering of thyroid to people who did NOT have a problem with their thyroid first became HyPERthyroid due to the excess hormone (the stage where weight loss COULD occur, but it wasn't guaranteed), but after a certain amount of time on the pill or after it was discontinued, the patients' burned out thyroids sometimes crashed and then became HyPOthyroid. Weight CAN be an indicator only if a select combination of other symptoms are present as well, but it's not foolproof, and it's certainly not the most important thing going on with you right now!  

I have longstanding HyPOthyroidism, and yes, it is incredibly miserable if untreated. The difference with me is that far from sweating, my skin is dry and cold in almost any circumstance. Body temperature fluctuates around 97.1 or so. My blood pressure is normal to low, and I have bradycardia (slow heartbeat). Both my muscles AND joints are very weak, but the joints are painful and tend to swell for no reason (I tested negative for autoimmune or rheumatoid causes). My night vision is impaired because my eye muscles are too weak to focus in the dark.

Dizziness can occur from high AND low blood pressure, as can fatigue and weakness. Depression is also common to both. A couple good sites to look at doctors' "report cards" from their patients is RateMDs.com or Vitals.com, if you need a boost deciding who would be best to try.

Best of Health! Stay in the fight!
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Avatar_f_tn
Since I haven't been diagnosed with any thyroid problem as yet, I'm not sure what to ask my doctor for in the way of tests that will help to determine my status.  I came to this site because so many of my symptoms fit the thyroid problem.  After reading several postings from people that have been treating these conditions for years and are still sick, I feel a little down.  I'm still going to pursue this avenue with the hope of finding meaningful help.  I will check the sites you recommended.

Again, I want to thank you for your interest in helping me.  I really appreciate your informed input.  THANKS!
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1050938_tn?1311557178
No problem :)

There is another possibility, here, which might send you to see a Neurologist rather than the Endocrinologist, depending. If there is a malfunction in your autonomic system (the part of your brain that controls unconscious functions such as temperature regulation, heartbeat, blood pressure, etc...) you may need to be tested for disorders in the family of Orthostatic Intolerance, since some of the symptoms you mentioned was lightheadedness upon rising and fatigue, which could be linked to a disruption in blood pressure. If your thyroid levels seem normal in spite of all the severe symptoms you're having, then the Neurologist may need to be your next step to narrowing down what is causing so much of your system to go haywire.

Here's hoping the answers find you soon!
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1050938_tn?1311557178
Here's a link to Orthostatic Intolerance symptoms on Wrongdiagnosis.com. Best of luck!

http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/o/orthostatic_intolerance/symptoms.htm
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1013194_tn?1296463081
I have whats called Hashimoto disease, it is an autoimmune disease where antibodies attack the thyroid gland and eventually you end up with hypothyroidism..If you are having tests done ask them to test you for Hashimoto, its a simple blood test, yes im sure i will improve its just hard to work out at the moment whether i have the sweats from the Hashi or the menopause right now is all..Best of luck to you as well and i hope you find a cause soon to what is causing you illness x
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Avatar_f_tn
Thanks again for all the info, advice and interest in my health.  I will consider all that you have shared with me, and follow up where I can.  Good health to you both.
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Avatar_f_tn
My recent thyroid TSH test result is 1.67.  I'm told this is OK.  My doc still does not think thyroid is my problem, but so far no other answer.  He didn't feel any of the other thyroid tests were relevent.  Am still doing other tests. I'm starting to think some of my meds could be the problem.  I take HCTZ and Lipitor for blood pressure; Wellbutrin and Lexapro for depression; Prilosec for gerd; Lomotil for diarrhea (generic for most of these); and a couple of others occasionally.  I also take several vitamin and mineral sups.  Have read that several of these prescription meds can cause sweating and other problems.  HCTZ, Lipitor, Wellbutrin and Lexapro are ones I've read about.  I'm not sure about the others.  Does anyone have experience with any of these?
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Avatar_m_tn
Were any thyroid tests other than TSH done?  If so, please post the results and reference ranges for each, so that members can have a look and see if there is agreement with your doctor's conclusion.
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Avatar_f_tn
Unfortunately, my doctor didn't think it necessary to run the other tests,  I did ask him about them.  If we don't figure something out soon, I will ask him to run them.  I am going to be doing a urine collection test soon, checking for carcinoid tumors.  Apparently, some of my sysptoms could be caused by this type of tumor.

Thanks for responding.
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640719_tn?1277143630
Have you been checked for lyme disease also? Lyme has most of the symptoms you have mentioned. Can't hurt to check.. it's not always the thyroid as I have recently learned.
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Avatar_f_tn
  I was checked years ago, but probably should be again.  I'll mention this to my doctor on next visit.   Thanks for your interest.  Since your problem wasn't thyroid, do you mind me asking what it was?
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Avatar_m_tn
Excessive sweating is one of the symptoms of hyperthyroidism. It is a condition in which the body produces more sweat than normal.

http://www.nutri-meds.com
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Avatar_f_tn
I know this is an old post but, did you ever find out what was wrong? I have been going through this also.
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649848_tn?1357751184
I don't think you'll get an answer; many members don't stay on the forum, once they get the answers they are looking for.
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