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Increased pain after opiods

Hello. So Ian off opiods!! Withdrawal is gone. My brain is actually pretty clear also considering! I was given pain medication for my back some stenosis, disc problems, compressed spinal cord, narrowing of cervical spine ECT a whole list. Anyway now that I'm off my back pain seems unbearable. Is this because I was used to blocking it out for so long? And now it's reminding me how bad it is OR is everyone coming off opiods experience this rebound pain? Will it ever ease up? BTW I was on 120 a mo the 15 mg oxy when. Those we're gone it was methadone.
9 Responses
Avatar universal
Sorry to read that ur in pain, pain is a physical response to injury if this acute pain is rearing its head then apart from the injury cureing its self then you will continue to feel it , now there is a psychological side to pain its called chronic pain which is usually the case after a longer period of injury, treatment and recovery and medical issues such cancer and other prolonged periods of pain. If ur saying ur pain had stoped and some time went by and the pain has returned in the same area then its normal for u to feel pain again as new or recuring injury has occurred.
2 Comments
Got it. Don't think the pain ever went away I think I just always felt the need to drown it in pain medication. I'm positive my body is still adjusting to coming off . I'm gonna be patient with this and rather deal with this pain over withdrawal again! Thank you for your input!
No problem friend, but please be careful doing the cold turkey it can kill, dont under estimate the physiological dependance u may have on ur pain meds, steady and slow reductiion over time please dont just stop taking them. Take care
Avatar universal
Spike--

I have no idea how old your post is--2018? I haven't been on MedHelp for years, but am back looking up some info about an antidepressant my hubby is withdrawing from---pure-d hell.

Anyhow--your post caught my eye. I had major back surgeries 18 months ago. The "original pain" was pretty much relieved by the surgeries, but 5 years out, I am still taking opioids to keep me moving. W/O them and yoga and massages, I'd give up.

I see my PCP, she had me on Norco 7.5's and I felt so much stigma and my family gave me SO MUCH CRAP for needing something for pain. I cannot take Ibuprofen more than 3 days a week. It's ruined my guts.

A couple years ago I told my dr I didn't want to take Norco and I hated how it made me feel--and how embarrassing it was to have to keep seeing her, month after month for my new scrip. I asked to step "down" to Tylenol #3. It's not nearly as strong as Norco and it doesn't being to relieve the pain, but I am not a screaming monster when I have some to take.

Long story--dr leaves the facility for personal reasons and I get a new doc--go in with fear and trembling b/c I can see this young guy cutting me off and slapping a giant red "ADDICT" on my forehead.

He could not have been kinder. Actually, double the dose of codeine and left the Tylenol the same.  I am an active, busy person. I have severe anxiety and not being able to move as I need, or to feel constant pain is the worst!

I'm charting how much I am taking and trying to be responsible. Hoping to not need refills EVER before 30 days. But, we'll see.

My new" dr says it's worse to be in intractable pain than the use something when needed and to keep moving. And honestly? The surgery helped with the excruciating pain of sciatica, but now I have chronic back problems..and always will!

My point is--when we have pain, we hurt, we can't function the way we want/need. I would be in a wheelchair by now--simply due to low back pain, 24/7. This "war od opioid" in my book, is an abject failure. The local kid who forges scrips and sells stuff is really doing a booming business.
1 Comments
Pain patients,

Herein lies our conflict. I have a 35 cervical spine injury with associated chronic pain. I have decided to titrate off Suboxone to assess my true pain. Not easy in and of itself. With added pain-horrible. Facilitating a chronic pain support group, the constant debate is quality of life over becoming dependent. I would say  live, for a period of time, without meds. If the quality of your physical life is seriously compromised- maybe reconsider. Keep in mind your psychological dependency level. I have not enjoyed taking narcotics. I have always opted to under dose.  I medicate from a high pain level to a moderate level. One of my concerns is, what if I go through withdrawals only to find that I cannot live with the pain. Well, I can at least make an educated decision based upon facts and experience. How can you have regrets having pragmatically weighed all of you options resulting in the best course of action? It's a tough road physically and emotionally.
Avatar universal
Spike--

I have no idea how old your post is--2018? I haven't been on MedHelp for years, but am back looking up some info about an antidepressant my hubby is withdrawing from---pure-d hell.

Anyhow--your post caught my eye. I had major back surgeries 18 months ago. The "original pain" was pretty much relieved by the surgeries, but 5 years out, I am still taking opioids to keep me moving. W/O them and yoga and massages, I'd give up.

I see my PCP, she had me on Norco 7.5's and I felt so much stigma and my family gave me SO MUCH CRAP for needing something for pain. I cannot take Ibuprofen more than 3 days a week. It's ruined my guts.

A couple years ago I told my dr I didn't want to take Norco and I hated how it made me feel--and how embarrassing it was to have to keep seeing her, month after month for my new scrip. I asked to step "down" to Tylenol #3. It's not nearly as strong as Norco and it doesn't being to relieve the pain, but I am not a screaming monster when I have some to take.

Long story--dr leaves the facility for personal reasons and I get a new doc--go in with fear and trembling b/c I can see this young guy cutting me off and slapping a giant red "ADDICT" on my forehead.

He could not have been kinder. Actually, double the dose of codeine and left the Tylenol the same.  I am an active, busy person. I have severe anxiety and not being able to move as I need, or to feel constant pain is the worst!

I'm charting how much I am taking and trying to be responsible. Hoping to not need refills EVER before 30 days. But, we'll see.

My new" dr says it's worse to be in intractable pain than the use something when needed and to keep moving. And honestly? The surgery helped with the excruciating pain of sciatica, but now I have chronic back problems..and always will!

My point is--when we have pain, we hurt, we can't function the way we want/need. I would be in a wheelchair by now--simply due to low back pain, 24/7. This "war od opioid" in my book, is an abject failure. The local kid who forges scrips and sells stuff is really doing a booming business.
Avatar universal
For chronic pain (which my wife suffered from) the best book I can offer is Chapter 1 of the book "The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity" by Norman Doidge. Also the website by UCSB professor Paul K Hansma. Basically chronic pain can be cured.

The brain has a map of the body in it. People who lose a limb still have a "phantom limb", because even though the physical limb is gone, the body map in their brain still has that limb. Similarly, it also works the other way: people who have a stroke which damages the body map in the brain, say it damages the brain's body map of their left arm, the person no longer thinks their left arm is theirs, and they may ask the nurse to take it away because they don't know who it belongs to.

Our reality, the reality we live in, is actually created in our brains. The reality of our body is the body map in our brain. To the extent that our brain's body map matches up well with our actual physical body then things go well. When the brain's body map gets out of sync with our real body, then we may have problems.

Pain is generated in the brain. It's the brain telling us something's wrong, pay attention, this is important. Pain can be useful if it gets us to do the right thing. Such as, stop moving, you're injured. Pain can also be not useful when it becomes chronic pain, as in, my body has healed itself, there's nothing wrong with my body anymore, my body is fine, but by brain's map of my body is still telling me that part of my body is heavily damaged and in great pain, and even the slightest tough to that part of my body feels like a freight train hit it and triggers massive pain — which is totally NOT helpful at all!

The big breakthrough is discovering how the brain becomes rewired, the brain is not static, it gets rewired, we "learn" chronic pain, and the breakthrough is we can also force ourselves to "unlearn" that chronic pain, we can force our brains to unwire that pain, so we no longer feel that pain anymore. It takes a lot of will power and effort, and faith that it can be done, but the good news is it can be done. Which is so amazing it sounds like science fiction. But apparently it's actually real.
495284 tn?1333894042
COMMUNITY LEADER
Give yourself some time to repair your insides also.  Our bodies are so used to the pain meds and when it is taken away it doesnt know how to react right away.  Rebound pain is no fun and very painful but in time it will get better.  Hang tight, you are doing great!
1 Comments
Thank you.  I'm hopeful.  A round of prednisone helped greatly.  Now if I could actually fall asleep instead of wiggling around that'd be great!
495284 tn?1333894042
COMMUNITY LEADER
Sleep is usually the last thing that comes back.  It's a time thing........I really hated that word when i first came here!  All i heard was time and patience!!
1 Comments
Kinda figured.  Thanks for your input.  It been every night when I go to sleep I'm tired but my body can't rest if that makes sense.  
495284 tn?1333894042
COMMUNITY LEADER
I remember that part and i feel for you but soon enough you will be sleeping like a baby again!
1 Comments
Thank you so much!  That gives me hope.  Sleep and emotion.  I cry for everything!
495284 tn?1333894042
COMMUNITY LEADER
I would cry over commercials!!!  Congrats on feeling again~
2 Comments
So I'm not getting depressed? This is a good thing? !
No your not getting depressed!  Your feelers are working again and it is a very good thing!!
Avatar universal
Another trick is if you are on a medication that works, and you want to get off that medication, you can SLOWLY taper off that medication. The trick is to taper off so slowly that your brain/body doesn't notice it's happening. The brain slowly adjusts itself to the lower dose as the dose is lowered, and this way you can slowly get the brain to adjust itself back to normal. This process may take a long time, like 6 months, or a year, but it has been effective, such as getting people off methadone.
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495284 tn?1333894042
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