Aa
A
A
A
Close
Heart Disease Community
20.1k Members
Avatar universal

Russert's death

Russert's untimely death raises questions about how we're treating heart disease

Dear Friend,

You won't hear me say this often about anyone in mainstream media, but T. Russert,  newsman and anchor of Meet the Press, was someone I respected. I took great joy in watching politicians squirm under his tough questioning. So, like most Americans, I was sad to hear the tragic news of his sudden death. After all, Russert was just 58 years old — relatively young by today's standards.

According to his doctors, he had diabetes, heart disease, and he was overweight. Yet without fail, every time I hear a news story or read an article on his death, the commentators express their surprise that something like this could happen to someone who was on blood pressure pills and cholesterol drugs, who exercised routinely (in fact, he worked out on the treadmill the morning he died), and who was on a diet. He'd even recently passed a stress test.

I wish I could say I was shocked by this news. Unfortunately, stories like this one only highlight what I've been telling you all along: Blood pressure doesn't cause heart disease, high cholesterol drugs aren't cure-alls, and exercise can do more harm than good. In short, none of the steps Russert's doctors told him to take to address his health concerns were doing a darn bit of good.

Instead, if someone had told him to focus on keeping his homocysteine levels low and his magnesium levels high, we might not be having this conversation in the first place. Homocysteine makes cholesterol stick to your artery walls and can also contribute the hardening of your arteries. It's simple to control your cholesterol levels by loading up on B vitamins, like B6, B12 and folate.

Magnesium also has vital heart-healthy benefits.
"Statins don't protect against heart attacks. And [Russert] didn't know that the lack of one nutrient could have cost him his life," said acclaimed neurosurgeon Dr. R. B. "The number-one cause of sudden cardiac death is magnesium deficiency. Cardiac patients and those with diabetes have the lowest magnesium levels of all."

I've written to you before about the many benefits of magnesium. This mineral prevents blood clots, dilates blood vessels, and can also stop the development of dangerous heart irregularities. It's why I've been such a long-time advocate of increasing magnesium intake for its heart-health benefits – not to mention what it does for your bones and bodily tissues. I've even used magnesium in emergency medicine to help limit brain damage in stroke victims. And yet more than half of Americans have a magnesium deficiency.

"People who are deficient in magnesium are most likely to have sudden cardiac arrest, and when they do arrest, they are harder to resuscitate,"DR. B. says. "Many simply can't be resuscitated."

Dr. S. B. surgeon in chief of New York's M. Medical Center, did a good job of summing up just why the death of the beloved newsman has so shaken both Americans in general and doctors in particular: "It makes us all feel mortal, and it also highlights the natural history of this silent killer and our limited ability to catch this killer before it strikes."

Fighting on in the battle against heart disease,

W. C. D. M.D.
40 Responses
63984 tn?1385441539
Dixter, once again I would suggest your opinions might be taken more seriously if you would include documentation for quoted sources.

You wrote:
"Statins don't protect against heart attacks. And [Russert] didn't know that the lack of one nutrient could have cost him his life," said acclaimed neurosurgeon Dr. R. B.

This isn't documentation.
Avatar universal
This is DR. R.B. opinion! You have to do your research homework!
I'm not permitted to enter names of DR.
21064 tn?1309312333
If the doctor has conducted a study and the results have been published, you are welcome to provide the citation in its entirety.

Thanks!

Avatar universal
This does not seem like an appropriate time to exploit Tim Russert's death by a writing SUGGESTING that following an alternative treatment plan being sold by a doctor known only by his initials MIGHT HAVE saved his life.  

Implications and scare tactics do not replace controlled research.  If there is such in this matter, it would be good to see it.  

367994 tn?1304957193
QUOTE OP: "Blood pressure doesn't cause heart disease, high cholesterol drugs aren't cure-alls, and exercise can do more harm than good. In short, none of the steps Russert's doctors told him to take to address his health concerns were doing a darn bit of good."

Does the writer suggest don't lower bp, don't take choles lowering drugs, and don't exercise?  Lower risk factors are meaningless?
21064 tn?1309312333
Dixter,

I sent you a PM.  If you can validate the research with a reference or citation, we can create a Health Page dedicated to alternative therapies.  This could help disseminate valid information to members who may wish to consider alternatives to modern medicine.  MedHelp is willing to allow a Health Page for this type of information IF the references are provided, and the material is not copyright protected.

Connie



Have an Answer?
Top Heart Disease Answerers
159619 tn?1538184537
Salt Lake City, UT
11548417 tn?1506084164
Netherlands
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
Is a low-fat diet really that heart healthy after all? James D. Nicolantonio, PharmD, urges us to reconsider decades-long dietary guidelines.
Can depression and anxiety cause heart disease? Get the facts in this Missouri Medicine report.
Fish oil, folic acid, vitamin C. Find out if these supplements are heart-healthy or overhyped.
Learn what happens before, during and after a heart attack occurs.
What are the pros and cons of taking fish oil for heart health? Find out in this article from Missouri Medicine.
How to lower your heart attack risk.