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mono and myocarditis
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mono and myocarditis

I was diagnosed with mononucleosis about 8 weeks ago.I was experiencing a rapid heart rate (resting,around 90-100 bpm).Last week I began experiencing palpitations that would last approximately 5 minutes and then stop.By hearing about my symptoms and listening to my heart,the doc diagnosed me with myocarditis.I have a few questions:
1.what is the long-term prognosis for myocarditis that is related to mono? will i have permenant damage?
2.is there a better way to diagnose myocarditis?
3.is there anything i can do to make my prognosis more postive?
4.is there anything i can do to prevent the palpitations?
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you for visiting the family practice forum.
The causes of myocarditis are numerous. The majority of cases are probably due to viral infection (Coxsackie B virus accounts for nearly 50%), however there are other viral causes including Mono as well as bacterial, fungal, and protozoal etiologies as well as causes due to certain medications.

The long term prognosis with myocardis is very good. Mortality is actually quite rare. However, if symptoms indicate congestive heart failure (severe shortness of breath, edema) are present, patients should be monitored in the hospital.

There are several symptoms commonly seen with myocarditis. These include shortness of breath, chest discomfort (described commonly as "pleuritic" .. meaning ..worse when you take a deep breath). Fever and fatigue is present in about 25% of patients. Palpitations are quite common. Only in rare circumstances are medications used to treat these. Typically they resolve in time provided the patient with myocardis remains stable. If you are having symptoms such as severe shortness of breath, or symptoms related to congestive heart failure, you may need to see the doctor to consider medications such as ACE inhibitors or blood thinners. The fact that your doctor has not hospitalized you leads me to believe that your myocarditis is a mild case and should resolve in time. Complications and/or permanent damage relate more to the severity of the myocarditis than do they to the actual "cause". For example, two people could both get myocarditis following exposure to the same virus. Simply being exposed to the same virus does not mean that both people with have the same "severity" of illness. Limiting your salt intake and "taking it easy" would be helpful. Anti-inflammatory agents such as "motrin" are somewhat helpful in some patients as well.

Myocarditis is typically diagnosed based on the "symptoms" and "history" a patient presents. An EKG should be performed to make sure there are no arrhythmias (irregular heartbeat), other tests which are more sensitive are an MRI or a Gallium scan.

Again, I suspect that since you have not been hospitalized that your condition is mild and should slowly resolve over the next 1-2 weeks. Limiting salt, activity and the use of anti-inflammatory agents may be helpful. However, if the palpitations are very bothersome, your doctor may consider doing a 24 hour "holter monitor" to check for evidence of any type of arrhythmia throughout the day.

I hope this proves helpful to you!
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Avatar_n_tn
hello all,
i was wondering if anyboby could help me, i have two buldging discs in my back they are L5  and s1 and it hurts real bad. do these fix themself or what? i am in alot of pain. thanks
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Avatar_n_tn
Bulging discs in the back can be treated several ways. My opinion has always been to try to treat them conservatively. If the MRI shows that they are pressing on the spinal cord significantly, surgery may be necessary. I prefer to start with the use of anti-inflammatory medication, back exercises and possibly physical therapy.
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Avatar_n_tn
I've had sciatica due to a herniated disc at L5 since summer.  I'm seeing a chiropractor and have improved a lot since then, but I am still having pain in my buttock and behind my knee, as well as a tingling in my toes.  

What I am wondering is should I stay my course of treatment since I am improving, though slowly, or should I look into other options?

Sorry for posting my question as a comment but I cannot afford the $20 to post a new one.
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Avatar_n_tn
A related discussion, Treatment for Mono was started.
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