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279234 tn?1363108849
3T Safe for Vena Cava Filters?
Can someone help me look online for info on whether or not it is considered "safe" to have an MRI on a 3T if you have a green filled filter/ (it's located in my vena cava)? My filter is made of titanium and can be temporary or permanent. I want to be prepared next time if and when I decide to pursue this thing. I did manage to look some things up and found that it is considered safe on a 3T but nothing bigger. I just don't know how reliable these sources are. If it's true that I could then... I got lied to and I hate that.
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Avatar universal
Hi Slightlybroken,

I found this:

Static Magnetic Fields

Most currently used clinical MR scanners are 1.5 to 3 tesla (T), which corresponds to 30 000 to 60 000 times the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field. The greatest risk from the main magnetic field is attraction of a ferromagnetic object into the scanner.

For the purposes of this statement, the term "ferromagnetic" is used to denote a substance that experiences an attractive force in the presence of a magnetic field. As a result of ferromagnetic interactions, a device may be moved, rotated, dislodged, or accelerated toward the magnet.

Thus, a ferromagnetic object might be accelerated toward the magnet at dangerously high velocities and/or with dangerously high forces, creating a "projectile effect" that could lead to significant patient injury or damage to the MR system.

Device function may also be altered or negated as a result of interactions with the strong static magnetic fields. Most, but importantly not all, currently implanted cardiovascular devices are either nonferromagnetic or weakly ferromagnetic. The higher the static magnetic field of the MR system, the greater the resultant ferromagnetic forces on weakly or overtly ferromagnetic materials.

Thus, findings from ex vivo studies at fields of 1.5 T or lower may not necessarily apply to imaging of devices at higher field strengths (eg, 3 T and higher), which produce significantly greater forces. For devices in which the ferromagnetism of the device is a significant safety concern, consideration should be given to performing the study at the lowest field strength available to reduce whatever ferromagnetic risk might be present.

Finally, all healthcare professionals are reminded that currently used MR scanners are typically superconducting and thus are always "on."
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The entire article is at:
http://www.circ.  ahajournals.   org/cgi/content/full/116/24/2878 (remove spaces)

Hope this helps a little.  I will see what else I might can find tomorrow.

Take care,
doni
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