Neurology Expert Forum
Constant Pins and Needles in Hands
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Fibromyalgia, Headaches, MS, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Constant Pins and Needles in Hands

I woke up this morning with a pins and needles feeling in my right hand.  It is also tingly.  I also have felt like I pulled a muscle in the right side of my back - maybe even the lowest part of my trap muscle.  Not sure if that can be related.  I worked out 5 times this week but sleep wasn't too great.  This is the 1st time this ever happened to me.  What actions should I take today?
Related Discussions
Avatar_dr_f_tn
Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with your doctor.

Without the ability to examine you and obtain a history, I can not tell you what the exact cause of your symptoms is. However I will try to provide you with some useful information.

When someone wakes up with symptoms similar to yours, the most common cause is that during sleep, the nerve to the hand was compressed on, leading to transient nerve irritation. This is in the vast majority of patients transient, and symptoms resolve without sequalae. The only thing to be done is to make sure that additional pressure to the nerves to the limb be avoided until symptoms have resolved.

If you frequently start to experience pins and needles in your hands, particularly if they wake you up from sleep, your symptoms may be consistent with carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is the area in the wrist that the median nerve passes through. If the median nerve is compressed in the carpal tunnel, it can cause symptoms in the first three digits of the hand most often, but in some patients shooting pains can occur all the way up to the elbow. The symptoms are often worst at night. Carpal tunnel syndrome can be caused by repetitive movements at the wrist like typing. Treatment includes wearing a wrist brace and in severe cases surgery.

Another cause of symptoms in the hand is a radiculopathy, or a pinched nerve. The spinal cord is encased by bones called vertebra. Nerves start to form as they come off the spinal cord and exit through holes formed between the vertebra. If a nerve is compressed on as it exits through these holes, particularly in an area called the nerve root, a radiculopathy results. The compression could be due to arthritis of the spine or due to a herniated disc or other lesions. The symptoms include pain at the level of the problem (i.e. neck or back etc) and pain that may radiate down the arm or leg (depending on where the problem is). In more advanced cases, muscle weakness or sensory symptoms such as tingling or numbness may occur. A radiculopathy is often diagnosed based on history, physical examination, and MRI of the spine.

If your symptoms recur in your right hand, evaluation by your primary doctor/family physician is recommended, with referral to a neurologist as felt to be indicated by him/her.

Thank you for this opportunity to answer your questions, I hope you find the information I have provided useful, good luck.
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
469720_tn?1388149949
Blank
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-treatable... Blank
Oct 04 by Lee Kirksey, MDBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank