Neurology Expert Forum
HAND 'JITTER' WHEN BEGINNING FINE MOTOR TASK
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Fibromyalgia, Headaches, MS, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

HAND 'JITTER' WHEN BEGINNING FINE MOTOR TASK

FREQUENTLY, WHEN I AM BEGINNING A TASK INVOLVING FINE MOTOR SKILLS LIKE SOLDERING OR MODEL BUILDING MY HAND "JITTERS" JUST AS I'M PLACING INSTRUMENTS TO WORK.  IT USUALLY STOPS WHEN THE TASK IS BEING DONE, AND IF I DISTRACT MYSELF WITH OTHER MOVEMENT OR SPEECH IT DOES NOT OCCUR.  THIS OCCURRED LAST YEAR FOR A SHORT WHILE, THEN STOPPED.  IT HAS BEGUN AGAIN.  WHAT IS IT?
Related Discussions
Avatar_n_tn
First keep in mind that I am unable to diagnose you, because I cannot examine you and that this forum is for educational purposes only. The symptoms you describe fit into the general category of tremor.  Further, a tremor that is worse just before your hand reaches its tartet is called an intention tremor, and a tremor that is worse with a task is called an action tremor.  The are a number of causes of Action/intension tremors. One common cause is  benign essential tremor.  This condition runs in families, but also occurs sporadically.  affected patients have a fine tremor that is increased by stress or embrassement.  A portion of the patients also has tremor that affects their head, causing constant fine head motion.  Other causes physiologic tremor also affect by stress and lack of sleep and vigorous exercise.  Less commonly serious diseases can present with Action/intention tremor, these diseases affect the cerebellum and the brain stem centers that control muscle coordination.  Such diseases include Wilsons disease, genetic diseases of the cerebellum, and cerebellar degeneration due to drugs (such as anti-seizure medications and Alcohol) or toxins.  There are also tremors that occur at rest and may be a sign of parkinsons disease.  With the symoptoms you describe I suspect you may have some physiologic tremor that would improve with rest and avoiding drugs that make tremor worse, such as caffiene.  However, I would recommend that you see a neurologist who specializes in Movement disorders to rule any serious cause of the tremor and to provide you with medication if needed (beta-blockers, valium, primidone, requip, sinemet are a few of the medications used to treat tremors).  I hope this has been helpfull.
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating Control: How to St...
Aug 28 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank