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Possibly tachycardia in a 23 month old???
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Possibly tachycardia in a 23 month old???

First what would be considered tachycardia for a 23 month old?  

Now for the story....We went on vacation to a rural part of CA and my son started having a seizure in his carseat.  We pulled over to make sure he wasn't choking and quickly realized that it was a seizure.  Luckily we were near a tourist attraction and went to the gift shop to call 911....we also caught the attention of a nurse.  He ended up having multiple seizures over the course of an hour and a half.  Paramedics arrived after about 45 minutes and put him in the ambulance.  They hooked him up to machines, one of which displayed his pulse.  It was at 200bpm.  I noted that in my brain because I'm having SVT issues.  He ended up being air lifted to a hospital an hour and a half away.  By the time we arrived he was doing alright, but they kept him overnight for observation.  The next day I told the pediatrician about his heart rate and my issues, just wondering if I should be concerned.  She ended up having an EKG done.  His EKG results were faxed and interpreted by a doctor in a big city.  That doctor said his EKG looked slightly abnormal and to have an Echo done when we got home.  That was it!

So, can a seizure cause his heart rate to go up that high?  What could be 'slightly abnormal' with an EKG?  And what is considered tachycardia in an almost 2 year old?  
11 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar_f_tn
Good morning and welcome to this site! Boy, what a trip you must have had! I hope by this point you have been able to find some peace with everything you are having to deal with. I will try and answer a few of your questions starting off with: do seizures cause an accelerated heart rate; I have never heard of it, however, that does not mean that it is not possible. You are dealing with electrical impulses both in the brain and the heart at the same time. If your son is going to be seeing a neurologist, certainly ask him that question. The normal heart rate range for a two year old is between 85 and 125 beats per minute. If your son was running a very high temperature at the time, it would be higher than that and that temperature could also cause the seizure as well; I'm sure you would be aware of that, as most mothers are. You stated that you have SVT, it is possible that your son has the same issue (I also have SVT and one of my daughters also has SVT as well) My youngest daughter had all kinds of electrical issues with her heart as well, and I just learned the other day that my brother is also dealing with an electrical problem with his heart. In other words....this could be a genetic issue going on in your family? As far as the EKG goes, never accept a statement like "it's slightly abnormal" from any doctor. The last I knew, we all pay the doctor's salary, right? You have every right to ask as well as, to understand everything about yourself as well as your children, as far as medicine goes. As far as your son's EKG goes....it's either abnormal or it's not, you are either pregnant, or you are not. Now, having said that, it is VERY important that you understand that what is seen on the EKG may not always be a problem and it may not always be "accurate". There are a lot of things that can affect the way the EKG looks and the machine will give a guide writeout for the doctor to consider when reading that EKG. Something like medicines can affect the EKG by changing the distances in the complex making it appear, say, that a patient has Long Q-T Syndrome which can be a real serious issue, and in reality, he may not have the problem at all once the medicine he was taking was stopped. The EKG reads the electrical system of the heart, but it can also show up things like if the heart walls are too thick or thin. If there is a question of that, an echo will certainly diagnose that much better as that test looks at muscle function and thicknesses; it also looks at the valves and their function. I hope some of this information will help; please keep us posted on the forum so we know how you and your son is doing. Take care
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2093880_tn?1334817368
Thank you for your response!!!  The SVT that I have, is most likely genetic...we're still trying to solve that mystery.  My mom died suddenly at 28 of heart failure, her brother died suddenly around 50 of heart failure, her other brother experienced heart failure at 47 and had a pacemaker inserted...then after a few years that wasn't working right and received a transplant.  So when I heard "slightly abnormal" EKG, I immediately wanted more answers.  Unfortunately the guy who read the EKG was not in the room with me.  I've ordered a copy of that EKG and I'm bringing it with me to my ablation consultation.  I figure that cardiologist may know how to read it, if not my uncle who had the transplant will be with me and knows all the best cardiologists in that city and he will help get it read  :)  I know that EKG's are sensitive, I just want to know if it was abnormal because maybe he moved or what.  I'm trying to think if he was on meds at that time...I don't think so, possibly an antibiotic.  They think his seizure was caused by a fever, but it wasn't all that high, only 101.6.  He is doing just fine now, but I would really like to know the answer to this 'slightly abnormal' EKG.  If it's was an error that's fine, but if there is a problem then we can investigate further.  With my family history I'm not going to let this just slide by.
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Avatar_f_tn
Good morning again! There is so much we need to talk about after reading your post; my husband has a testing this morning and needs me to drive him to the hospital. I will be back on the forums at some point today to send a reply to you. Your post really struck a cord. One thing I will tell you is that an EKG will 'look different' if there is movement. The EKG will have 'artifact' on it and any tech knows what that looks like and will ignor that look on the EKG.
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Avatar_f_tn
Hello again, I wanted to comment on the fact that your mother died at the young age of only 28 years. I'm sorry for that loss in your life, first and foremost. I am then looking at two uncles, one who also died at a young age and a second who had to be transplanted. A lot of people think that if a person dieds suddenly, that they automatically died as a result of 'heart failure' thinking the heart failed. Heart failure is a chronic form of heart disease, it does not kill suddenly. Coronary Artery Disease which causes blocked arteries can kill suddenly, but your mother being as young as she was probably did not have CAD; the reason for that is because the woman's hormones protect her from CAD during the childbearing years. (it also takes about 20 years of eating junk foods to cause enough plague buildup to clog arteries) That would lead one to consider a muscle disease such as Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy which can cause a sudden death event as well as electrical issues in the heart. This problem is generally genetic but can happen 'out of the blue'. There is also a gene called PRKAG2 which affects the heart (HCM combined with WPW) which is a type of Glycogen Storage Disease. This gene issue is EXTREMELY RARE, so it would not be the first thing to consider. A temperature of 101.6 is only one degree above normal and very unlikely to cause seizures; temps of 104+ might cause seizures. My daughter had one episode of seizures; her temp was 106. Adult cardiologists are not the best people to see for evaluating your son's EKG as a pediatric EKG is different from an adult. It is more important to see a pediatric cardiologist for him to be completely evaluated, especially in light of your family history. Do not put this on the back burner. Take care
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2093880_tn?1334817368
THANK YOU!!!  I plan on looking into all that information you just gave me.  I'm currently on a mission to figure out what has been plaguing my family.  My mom was in great health...active, thin, ate well...just an energetic, fun loving 28 year old mom and wife.  The uncle that received the transplant was also athletic and thin.  We were talking on the phone a few weeks ago and I asked him if he ever noticed anything when he was younger.  He told me that in his 30's he thought it was really odd that he could only play the first 8 minutes of a basketball game then have to sit out.  I played basketball again this year and noticed the same thing.  I wasn't feeling great earlier that day, feeling really tired and having a lot of SVT episodes, but things got better that evening and I went to my game.  I played exactly 8 minutes and had to sit out the rest of the game.  I firmly believe that their is a connection between what I have and what my family has dealt with.  I just need to nail it down, because I want my kids to have answers and hopefully not have to deal with this stuff.  
As for my son's temp, it wasn't abnormally high and his seizure was much longer than most febrile ones.  They said the temp really doesn't need to get that high, it just needs to move up at a fast rate for a febrile seizure to occur....that was news to me.  
His pediatricians office just called me back regarding his EKG.  They said they don't want to do an EKG because it's not related to his seizure.  I said, he already has a slightly abnormal one and that doctor said to get an echo.  With our history I'm not going to have you not look into this.  So they are ordering a copy of his EKG, which they should have done by now IMO and they will call us in so that HIS pediatrician can evaluate him.  The other pediatrician in the office saw him after we got home from the 'vacation'.  I'm very close to finding a new pediatrician.  If she doesn't look into this, I will find someone who will!  

Thanks again for all that information, I'm off to google  :)
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2093880_tn?1334817368
Again, thank you!!   I personally have had echo's done, holter monitor, and Cardiac CTA, along with EKG's.  The SVT is the only thing they have seen, besides a mitral valve prolapse.  My mom had a MVP also, but I know that a lot of people have them without incident.  I'm definitely going to my ablation consultation loaded with questions.  My uncle, who had the transplant, is coming to that appointment with me since that doctor did his pacemaker years ago.  Plus I'm going to be at the same hospital that he received all of heart care.  I was praying that my kids wouldn't have any of these heart issues, but if they do, I'm bound and determine to figure it out early.
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Avatar_f_tn
Stay on top of this!!! If you read my info page, you will see that we raise and show Great Pyrenees. I am off to a show and won't be back until Sunday night. I probably will not be able to get back on a computer unless the hotel has one available, I'll look. Do not let your pediatrician blow this off with your little one, ESPECIALLY with your family history! Insisyt on a pediatric cardiology consult. And PLEASE, keep us informed how things are going! Take care
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Avatar_f_tn
and another thought: see a PEDIATRIC cardiologist. Many people do not realize how the sub-specialties actually work. A surgeon will not know much more than the basics of cardiology and won't be able to answer many questions about cardiology because his training in that field is actually quite limited. For example: my own family doctor won't discuss heart issues with me because she says I actually know more about that field then she does. Can she listen to my heart and look at my EKGs, of course, but she turns everything over to the cardiologist if there is an issue. For the most part an adult cardiologist doesn't study pediatric cardiology although the pediatric cardiologist has to study adult cardiology. EKGs are different in those age groups and in children actually change as well, over time, to eventually become the adult EKG. Try and keep all of this in mind when you are considering having an adult cardiologist evaluating a situation for your baby.
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2093880_tn?1334817368
Thank you!  I'm going to ask a couple cardiologists that I trust if they have a pediatric cardiologist they can recommend.  I have a feeling we're going to need to go that route to have him checked out.
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2093880_tn?1334817368
Well, I totally let the pediatrician drop the ball.  The pediatrician said that they would refer us to a pediatric cardiologist...that never happened.  It all ended up getting lost in my doctors appointments because my ablation failed...apparently I have Junctional Tachycardia and have since developed A-fib...lovely right.  So I've been dealing with different medications and symptoms for the past few months, bouncing between appointments with my cardiologist and EP.  The ball was dropped  :/  

I took him into a walk in clinic last Friday because he had a cold and I wanted them to check his ears, hoping to avoid another febrile seizure.  She checked his ears, throat and lungs, all were great.  Then she listened to his heart.  She said that he has an irregular heartbeat and should be seen by a pediatric cardiologist.  Knowing that his pediatrician's office failed to refer us the first time and that we don't have pediatric cardiologists in our area, I have emailed my EP from the city and I'm asking him who he would recommend seeing.  Once I have a name, then I'll call the pediatrician and make them refer him.  I hope that we'll get answers for my son soon.  The good news is that he really doesn't seem to have symptoms from his heart, although he is only 2 so it might be hard to tell.    
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Avatar_m_tn
I am so sorry you are gong through everything, we have had our fair share.. as far as you little man, if people are hearing these irregular HB call your peditrican, to see if he could be set up on a holter monitor.. I thionk giving your history they wouldn't have na issue with it.. good luck

one more thing  YOU DIDN'T LET HIS DOCTOR DROP THE BALL THEY DID. you were trusting enough to have them make the referral you can't make it so you didn't lwt them drop the ball
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