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What does my MRI say in Lay Person's language?
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What does my MRI say in Lay Person's language?

I've had MS for 24 years and recently had an MRI, as part of a general neuro work-up.  My MS is stable and I have been called a "walking miracle."  I have a neurogenic bladder, some cognitive issues, and am on disability.  
MRI results:
A small retention cyst is seen posteriorly in the left sphenoid simus.  The intracranial vasculature demonstrate expected signal void.  The pituitary infundibulum is in the midline.  No Chiari malformation is noted.  On FLAIR and T2 weighted images, numerous periventricular. globular, and punctate areas of increased signal intensity are seen.  These are seen to involve the corpus callosum as well.  Many of them have a radial or transverse elongated appearance consistent with Dawson's fingers.  Many are in juxtacortical location.  There is a suggestion of a small area of increased signal intensity in the inferior posterior pons.  Several small areas of increased juxtacortical position in the midline in the cerebellum.  Small lesions are also noted to be in an extreme juxtacortical position in left and right frontal lobes, left parietal lobe.  No restriction diffusion is noted.  The ventricular system is not enlarged.  Some of these lesions are associated with parenchymal brain loss ("black holes") on T1 weighted imaging.  No Mass effect is noted.

IMPRESSION:
Abnormal MRI scan demonstrating:
1. Numerous small juxtacortical areas of increased signal intensity on T2 and FLAIR imaging.
2. Numerous, too numerous to count, punctate, globular, and linear areas of increased signal intensity in the periventricular region with minimal involvement of the corpus callosum.
3.  Small areas of encephalomalacia on T1 weighted imaging in many of the areas described above.

CLINICAL COMMENT:
This study would be strongly suggestive of demyelinating disease given the distribution of lesions, involvement of the corpus callosum. their radial orientation, and their juxtacortical location.  No lesions appear acute.
Tags: MRI, ms, mri head
2054227_tn?1360523094
This MRI is consistent with a person w/ MS.
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