Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
Avatar universal

Formication like feeling

Hi, I was wondering if anyone could help me. So I experience this annoying condition where I feel itching or pain mostly on my rib cage or chest. As I would describe it, it is something like formication which is the sensation when you feel like there are insects crawling under your skin. The thing is it is very random and at times I don't feel anything but then a day will come when it becomes quite unpleasant. Now I've read online it could happen because of tiredness but that can't be the case since I am currently not working but spending time at home most of the time. I sleep around 9 to 10 hours. Going to sleep at 12pm and waking up at 10am or something. As what I do during the day is mainly play video games or watch TV with the family. The annoying thing is this feeling or sensation can happen at any time when doing or not doing anything. Sometimes it happens during the night and I start feeling hunger or there is this popping sensation in my chest.

Now I used to go to the doctor periodically few months ago and she described me some drugs, don't remember which ones but I stopped taking them since I started feeling a lot better. But this thing has returned and I don't know what to do now. Can anyone help me get through until my next appointment. It is at the end of May. Thanks in advance.
2 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
134578 tn?1614729226
The feeling of little invisible ants crawling on your skin can happen for a lot of reasons, including static electricity from nylon or other synthetic fabrics, having various diseases or conditions, taking certain drugs, or going off certain drugs.

There's a long list on Wikipedia of what might cause it, including some things you could doubtless write off immediately but one or two that might be worth considering. (For example, herpes zoster (shingles) or SSRI withdrawal would probably be more common than mercury exposure). And some of the things, you would know if you had them by other symptoms, so you could write those off too. Here's the list.
- pesticide exposure
- mercury poisoning
- diabetic neuropathy
- skin cancer
- syphilis
- Lyme disease
- hypocalcaemia
- herpes zoster (shingles)
- neurocysticercosis
- stimulant intoxication or withdrawal (meth, cocaine, ecstasy)  
- opiods
withdrawal from
- alcohol
- benzodiazepine
- SSRI/SNRI antidepressants
- tramadol

The point would be to try to figure out a cause, rather than just taking a pill to block the feeling. On the other hand, if the pill fixes it, that's better than dealing with the insects-crawling-on-you feeling!

Can you see if your doctor can call in a prescription refill before your appointment?
Helpful - 0
3 Comments
Can you see if your doctor can call in a prescription refill before your appointment?

I am not sure if this is even a possibility since the doc would probably refuse to talk on the phone where if I said my real name she would just keep telling to wait for the appointment. I wish things were that simple.
Yes, you can.  
I wasn't able to get a hold of the physician via the phone so I sent her an email explaining my symptoms, she replied that this is a matter that needs to be discussed face-to-face. And there is a long waiting list for appointments to see that doctor. She added saying you could visit another doctor but I don't want to deal with that so I am just going to wait it out. And at the time of writing this, I am feeling really good in comparison to when I created this thread.
Avatar universal
Not sure I would trust anything on Wikipedia to diagnose my health problem, but to each their own.  You say you're not tired, but oversleeping can make people pretty tired, actually.  Not getting enough exercise can make people pretty tired.  Now, I'm not sure tiredness causes such a thing.  I'm thinking more that it's an irritation from something in your bedding or your clothing or in your house, and if you're in your house all the time allergies to things in it will get worse.  If, on the other hand, it happened while you were exercising, it might be prickly heat, which is quite annoying but you don't get that sitting around the house or sleeping.  I'm not sure what a doctor would actually do for you, as there's no rash to look at, and as said above, taking things to numb it won't make it go away, only finding the cause and ridding yourself of it will do that.  Any chance it's emotional?  
Helpful - 0
3 Comments
I get most of my info about various medical conditions from the Mayo Clinic site or the CDC, but I don't disdain layperson-written sites when trying to understand what's being said about a condition. The description of the condition on Wikipedia seemed useful for a couple of reasons. One is, it's matter-of-fact that the sensation of ants or insects crawling on one's skin is a medically known condition, not just in people's heads or the result of having DTs. The other is that the list casts a very wide net. When you're suffering from something medically mysterious, the more possibilities you can consider and rule out as the cause, the better. Sometimes a list like this will name something that the person would not have realized could have a connection to his problem. Nobody was saying he should not go to his doctor, I was just looking for ideas about causes of the condition.
I'm not saying I never look at Wikipedia for a referral to another site.  I only mentioned it because it's not peer-reviewed by anyone, not even an editor, and anyone can change it to say anything they want it to until somebody else notices.  It's fun, but not authoritative on anything and wrong on everything somewhere in every article.  So while it can give the kind of global environment you're talking about, I only mentioned it in case anyone's reading this and might think it's equivalent to other sources of info, which it isn't.  It was created more as an experiment in crowdsourcing and fun, and it is fun.  What's interesting when looking at sites like Mayo Clinic and many others is that the same exact article often appears, and most frequently the UR source is the NIH website.  Most sites are just looking for clicks on ads.  Peace.
Any chance it's emotional?

This stuff started happening around the spring of 2013 when I was close to finishing the high schools and some exams.

2013-2017 I've probably visited dozens of doctors and no one was able to do **** since no one knew where to begin with.

Until quite recently 2017+ things have become much better and I stopped complaining about my condition. But this thing seems to have returned.

I'm thinking more that it's an irritation from something in your bedding or your clothing.

I tend to do better when I am not covering torso as sometimes a simple t-shirt causes quite an irritation so during some times when I sleep I only cover my legr with the blanket and not the upper part.

Have an Answer?

You are reading content posted in the Men's Health Community

Top Men's Health Answerers
1622896 tn?1562364967
London, United Kingdom
139792 tn?1498585650
Indore, India
11369760 tn?1449504372
Southwest , MI
Learn About Top Answerers
Didn't find the answer you were looking for?
Ask a question
Popular Resources
STDs can't be transmitted by casual contact, like hugging or touching.
Syphilis is an STD that is transmitted by oral, genital and anal sex.
Discharge often isn't normal, and could mean an infection or an STD.
Chlamydia, an STI, often has no symptoms, but must be treated.
Bumps in the genital area might be STDs, but are usually not serious.
Get the facts about this disease that affects more than 240,000 men each year.