Aa
Aa
A
A
A
Close
1542193 tn?1293194607

Cardiac or lungs

Hi, my 6 yr old grandson had what they thought was scarlet fever in the beginning of November... the tests came back negative for that and because of how he looked someone suggested I have him looked at for possible Kawasaki Disease.  The pediatrician treating him said he had all the outward signs of it but it didn't show in his blood work.  Now we have noticed that he is blue around his mouth going up to his nose.  Today at his doctor's appt. she noticed that you could see his heart beating just by looking at his ribs, this has never happened before and is something new with him.  He has complained intermittently of chest pain as well.. what do I need to do to find out what this is or could it really be Kawasaki Disease? or something else.  His little 18 month old cousin has a CHD so there is family history there and we want to have him checked out as well.
11 Responses
Sort by: Helpful Oldest Newest
Avatar universal
I was so glad to see your post this morning, Betts, and glad to hear that things have turned more to the bright side of things for your grandson. I hope you will continue to come onto our site with your questions and concerns. I also hope that at some point maybe your daughter will also visit us here; having a child with any kind of heart problem can be so overwhelming for any parent especially a mother. I wish you well!
Helpful - 0
1542193 tn?1293194607
Thanks grendslori... you were spot on.. he has been diagnosed with mitral valve prolapse and regurgitation, and his left atrium is enlarged... he also has tachycardia.  They are going to get him the monitor that checks his heart which they will want him to wear to 2 or 3 weeks and they will just keep checking the prolapse to make sure it is not worsening.. it is nice to know that there is a forum here to get help or just vent, thanks so much!
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
First i wanted to say, good luck with seeing the pediatric cardiologist today; I hope you will come back and share what news you have received as well. We are a support forum, so feel free to come back anytime. The shortened 'spikes', if the looked like an 'm' could be the sign of an enlarged atrium. I'm not sure exactly how the complex looked. Some complexes can look like this in children and still be totally normal. A child's EKG voltages are different than an adults which makes the EKG appear different from what most adults expect to see. I wish you well.  
Helpful - 0
1542193 tn?1293194607
When I talk about the spikes being cut off, I mean instead of coming to a peak the top of the spike was shorter and flat across, it did not come to a spike ....  hopefully it is nothing, I did get a phone call yesterday saying they wanted to see him tomorrow, so I hope we will get tto the bottom of this.... I am nervous though because if it was nothing I was told they would just tell me to follow up with family doc so they wouldn't take the appt away from someone who needs it, so perhaps they found something but hopefully it is not too serious...?
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Sometimes that can look to be the case with an echo, things can still be normal. It is very difficult to try and explain the spikes being 'cut off' as you describe. Even having worked as an EKG supervisor, I'm not sure what you are describing. The only thing i can think of is the machine alternating between the different areas of the heart. Some complexes are higher than others and that is normal.
Helpful - 0
1542193 tn?1293194607
my grandson had his echocardiogram on Friday and we are waiting for the results, they didn't have anyone in that day to read them which was frustrating... the tech took about 140 pics and she kept taking measurements of what seemed like the left atrium... as well, it looked like the spike on some of his heartbeats was cut off, anyone know any info on that that can help me to understand things?  His heart seemed to be beating so fast and the blood flow pics looked like it was working overtime.... ????
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
I can certainly relate to the frustration your family feels when the doctors seem to appear lacking in knowledge. I have been through this more times than I care to count with my own daughter. (I've even had doctors asking me what to do to help them deal with my daughterbecause they were frustrated trying to help her!) The problem you face is that when you live in a smaller community, the doctors rarely see children with serious health issues, so they are restricted in gaining knowledge. Hopefully, the pediatric cardiologist your grandson will see will be able to answer your questions. Piece of advice: go with your daughter  to this appointment; when two adults go, they may hear and remember different things that the doctor says. Take care.
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hi there do you know if your grandson has had an EKG, the EKG may also tell if he has had anything wrong?  I know that waiting seems like for ever.. hang in there and I hope you can get some answers..
good ;uck
Michelle
Helpful - 0
1542193 tn?1293194607
Hi gendslori... he has not yet been seen by a pediatric cardiologist, he will see one on Jan 7th after his echocardiogram.... I live in a small city where the docs just look for the easy stuff and will not consider anything else because they admit they don't know enough about serious medical conditions.  I mean no disrespect to the medical community but how can I have confidence in them if they do not themselves.  We unfortunately do not know his father's history so it is harder when you are missing a huge chunk of information that could help explain some things... I guess I will just have to wait until Jan 7th when he has his echo... thanks for the information..
Helpful - 0
Avatar universal
Hello and welcome to our site! My first question to you would be: has your grandson been seen by a pediatric cardiologist yet or has he just been seen by a pediatrician? If the pediatrician has been seeing him and is suspicious of Kawasaki Syndrome, it would be VERY surprising that the pediatrician did not send him immediately to the cardiologist as this syndrome can be lethal in a small amount of children. He would certainly need to have an echo done to check the coronary arteries as well as the muscle of the heart walls. The best place to be evaluated would be at a university hospital which has a children's hospital available. The fact that his cousin has CHD, does not mean that there is a family history of CHD in the family. If, however, several family members in your grandson's immediate family (parents, brothers and sisters) of Kawasaki Syndrome, that would then be a different story. One in every hundred babies born have some form of CHD, only a very few are actually genetic in nature, most CHDs are structural problems which start with the unborn baby's development. Some electrical problems with the heart can run in families such as Long Q-T Syndrome, Wolffe-Parkinson-White. Muscle diseases of the heart, known as Cardiomyopathies, can also be genetic, all of these problems tend to run in the immediate family members. Labs for Kawasaki tend to have high white blood counts with a low red blood count (anemia) and if the child has blood work done later on than the platelet counts are high. Lab results would also reflect abnormalities if any other organs have been affected. This is a serious syndrome, if your grandson actually has it and he needs to see a pediatric cardiologist. Take care  
Helpful - 0
1542193 tn?1293194607
I need to clarify, he had all the outward symptoms except for the peeling skin on toes and swelling, everything else he had they said fit Kawasaki Disease...
Helpful - 0

You are reading content posted in the Pediatric Cardiology Community

Popular Resources
Fearing autism, many parents aren't vaccinating their kids. Can doctors reverse this dangerous trend?
Is a gluten-free diet right for you?
We answer your top questions about the flu vaccine.
Learn which over-the-counter medicines are safe for you and your baby
Yummy eats that will keep your child healthy and happy
Healing home remedies for common ailments